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A New Formation Solution – is the SSLC Right for Your Business?

Client Alert

In early January 2021, Ohio adopted Senate Bill 276 which established a Revised Limited Liability Company Act (“ORLLCA”) as Ohio Revised Code Chapter 1706, which effectively replaces the current Ohio Limited Liability Company Act (Ohio Revised Code Chapter 1706). The ORLLCA will become effective on January 1, 2022.

One of the principal changes within the ORLLCA is the ability to establish “series LLCs”. Ohio becomes the 15th state to adopt a “series LLC” (“SLLC”). The below FAQs will help you better understand the mechanics and nuances of a series LLC.

Is forming a Series LLC right for you?

SLLCs provide unique benefits for individuals and entities. If you own multiple businesses, the SLLC structure can assist with minimizing risk and limiting exposure to liabilities with respect to certain assets held by SLLC.

  1. What is a Series LLC?

The formation of the SLLC was introduced in Delaware in 1996 by top business lawyers in the state. This was prompted by business owners who wanted to form a unique entity that consisted of separate, individual interests but had the same asset and liability protection as the traditional limited liability company (“LLC”). Due to the rising popularity of SLLCs in Delaware, many states have adopted similar statutes. Synonymous with Delaware law, a SLLC in Ohio can establish, through its operating agreement, multiple divisions or “series” with separate assets, purposes, business objectives, members, and ownership interests. Each series is legally separate from one another and is only liable for its own debts and obligations. In short, each series operates similar to an independent subsidiary under the master limited liability company.

    2. How is it different from a traditional LLC?

The traditional LLC protects the owners from liability – but, in an effort to diversify risk within an entity structure – many entities form an “umbrella” of LLCs. The umbrella generally consists of a parent LLC and several subsidiary LLCs under the parent LLC’s control.

The SLLC is a variation of the traditional LLC and offers additional simplicity and flexibility to a business owner. The SLLC offers reduced setup and maintenance costs because only one Secretary of State filing is needed, regardless of how many series are a part of it. The most significant difference between these two types of entities is the enhanced liability and asset protection offered by the SLLC. With an SLLC, an owner no longer has to form the “umbrella” structure of several LLCs. So long as the entities with the SLLC adhere to the rules of the ORLLCA, the liabilities of the master LLC are not enforceable against any series that is a part of it and the liabilities of each series are not enforceable against another series.

    3. What types of businesses would benefit from the SLLC?

The SLLC structure can be beneficial for many different types of business owners. Specifically, real estate investors who own investment properties can utilize the SLLC structure to diversify risk within a portfolio. This structure is extremely valuable for business owners who have capital and other assets invested in multiple segments of an LLC and wish to have those assets protected.

    4. What are the drawbacks?

Since the SLLC structure is relatively new and only 14 other states permit their formation, there is little guidance by the IRS and state tax departments on the tax treatment of the SLLC. As such, there are tax risks associated with the formation of a SLLC and individuals and entities should consult their tax advisors regarding such risks.

To explore if utilizing and/or forming a SLLC will be advantageous for you or your business(es), please contact BMD Corporate and Mergers & Acquisitions Attorney Michael D. De Matteis, Esq. at mddematteis@bmdllc.com.


A Win for the Hospitals: An Update on the Latest 340B Lawsuit

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court unanimously rejected massive payment cuts to hospitals under the 340B drug discount program. Now, the Department of Health and Human Services no longer has the discretion to change 340B reimbursement rates without gathering data on what hospitals actually pay for outpatient drugs. This “straightforward” ruling was based on the text and structure of the statute, per the Supreme Court. Simply put, because HHS did not conduct a survey of hospitals’ acquisition costs, HHS acted unlawfully by reducing the reimbursement rates for 340B hospitals.

New Office of Environmental Justice Announced

The profound impacts of climate change, combined with environmental and industrial pollutions, have led the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to establish the Office of Environmental Justice (OEJ). The creation of OEJ aligns with President Biden’s Executive Order Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad. The OEJ will be led by Sharunda Buchanan, a former official for the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and will target disadvantaged communities around the country in hopes of improving the health of those populations and preventing future harm.

New York, Kansas, Massachusetts, and Delaware Become the latest States to Adopt Full Practice Authority for Nurse Practitioners

While the COVID-19 pandemic certainly created many obstacles and hardships, it also created many opportunities to try doing things differently. This can be seen in the instant rise of remote work opportunities, telehealth visits, and virtual meetings. Many States took the challenges of the pandemic and turned them into an opportunity to adjust the regulations governing licensed professionals, including for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs).

Explosive Growth in Pot of Gold Opportunity for Bank (and Other) Cannabis Lenders Driving Erosion of the Barriers

Our original article on bank lending to the cannabis industry anticipated that the convergence of interest between banks and the cannabis industry would draw more and larger banks to the industry. Banks were awash in liquidity with limited deployment options, while bankable cannabis businesses had rapidly growing needs for more and lower cost credit. Since then, the pot of gold opportunity for banks to lend into the cannabis industry has grown exponentially due to a combination of market constraints on equity causing a dramatic shift to debt and the ever-increasing capital needs of one of the country’s fastest growing industries. At the same time, hurdles to entry of new banks are being systematically cleared as the yellow brick road to the cannabis industry’s access to the financial markets is being paved, brick by brick, by the progressively increasing number and size of banks that are now entering the market.

2021 EEOC Charge Statistics: Retaliation & Impact of Remote Work

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) released its detailed information on workplace discrimination charges it received in 2021. Unsurprisingly, for the second year in a row, the total number of charges decreased as COVID-19 either shut down workplaces or disconnected employees from each other. In 2021, the agency received a total of approximately 61,000 workplace discrimination charges - the fewest in 25 years by a wide margin. For reference, the agency received over 67,000 charges in 2020, and averaged almost 90,000 charges per year over the previous 10 years.