Client Alerts, News Articles & Blog Posts

Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

CARES Act Expands Bankruptcy Options for Individuals and Small Businesses

Small Business Reorganization Act of 2019 (SBRA)

In August of 2019, President Trump signed into law the Small Business Reorganization Act of 2019 (SBRA) – a piece of legislation that gave small businesses a variety of benefits when filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.  Effective February 22, 2020, the SBRA offers small businesses with aggregate liabilities that do not exceed $2,725,625 the opportunity to resolve their outstanding debts and financial obligations through a more price-conscious and streamlined Chapter 11 process under a new subchapter V component of the Bankruptcy Code. In an attempt to minimize business liquidations, the SBRA will allow business owners to retain the equity in their business, while simultaneously providing more guidance and structure throughout the reorganization process at an affordable cost.

The SBRA’s key provisions include:

Simplifying the Process

Debtors now have 90 days to file their reorganization plan from the day in which they file their bankruptcy petition, with easier rules for extending their payment plans. The SBRA will also incorporate more lenient reorganization requirements. Aside from maintaining that all plans are “fair and equitable,” businesses now have two primary ways to repay their creditors: (1) the business, through its restructuring plan, will identify any “disposable income” (income not used to pay for a business’s necessary expenses) and how it plans on distributing this income to its creditors; or (2) the plan will lay out an outline of how a company intends on distributing some or all of its property, provided that it can demonstrate that such property “is not less” than the projected disposable income that would be paid to its creditors. In exchange for complying with one of these two plans, the SBRA permits business owners to maintain possession of their company.

Extending the Payment Schedule & Debt Dismissal

A small business’ debts are no longer required to be paid in full. Under the SBRA, business owners can now create a repayment schedule that can span anywhere from 3 to 5 years. By adhering to this payment schedule, business owners are permitted to maintain ownership of their companies. After complying with this 3- to 5-year creditor repayment plan, courts are required to discharge any remaining debt owed by the small business.

Standing Trustee Appointment

Similar to Chapter 13 personal bankruptcy filings, the SBRA establishes that once a small business files under the SBRA, a “standing trustee” will be appointed to oversee the case. Throughout the plan of reorganization payment period, the standing trustee will oversee the small business’ estate, which includes general business operations, reviewing the company’s financial condition, or possibly, reporting any fraud or misconduct to the court. The goal under the SBRA is that by appointing a standing trustee, small businesses will have an additional resource in ensuring that adherence to their reorganization plans. In addition, unless the court orders otherwise, no unsecured creditors’ committees are permitted to be appointed or otherwise oversee the case.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act provisions related to expanding bankruptcy options for small businesses

Under the CARES Act enacted March 27, 2020, the debt limit under the SBRA for small businesses filing under the new subchapter V of chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code increases from $2,725,625 to $7.5M for a period of 1 year only. The debt limit would then decrease back to $2,725,625 after the one-year increase. For small businesses in financial distress with debts between this range ($2,725,625 - $7,500,000), a time-sensitive evaluation of bankruptcy options should be considered prior to the expiration of the expanded debt limit in March,2021.

The CARES Act also extends benefits to individuals in a bankruptcy. For individuals in a chapter 13 bankruptcy case that have a material financial hardship due to the coronavirus, bankruptcy plans can be expanded for up to 7 years. Further, the coronavirus financial assistance funds shall not be considered “income” for bankruptcy purposes.

For more information about the changes to the bankruptcy laws, please contact Michael Steel at (330) 374-7471 or masteel@bmdllc.com.

A New Formation Solution – is the SSLC Right for Your Business?

In early January 2021, Ohio adopted Senate Bill 276 which established a Revised Limited Liability Company Act (“ORLLCA”) as Ohio Revised Code Chapter 1706, which effectively replaces the current Ohio Limited Liability Company Act (Ohio Revised Code Chapter 1706). The ORLLCA will become effective on January 1, 2022. One of the principal changes within the ORLLCA is the ability to establish “series LLCs”. Ohio becomes the 15th state to adopt a “series LLC” (“SLLC”). The below FAQs will help you better understand the mechanics and nuances of a series LLC.

Surprise! A Cautionary Tale for Out-Of-Network Billing: The No Surprises Act and the Impact on Healthcare Providers

SURPRISE! Congress passed The No Surprises Act at the end of 2020. Providers, particularly those billing as out-of-network providers, should start thinking about strategies to comply with this new law, set to take effect on January 1, 2022. In its most basic sense, the new law prohibits providers from billing patients for more than the in-network cost-sharing amount in most situations where surprise bills happen. It specifically applies to non-government payers and the amounts will be set through a process described in the new law. In particular, the established in-network cost-sharing amount must be billed for the following services:

Ohio Enacts Substantial Changes to Employment Discrimination Laws

In January, Governor Mike DeWine signed into law the Employment Law Uniformity Act, amending the employment protections in the Ohio Civil Rights Act in several significant ways. Such changes to the state’s anti-discrimination and anti-harassment laws have been considered and debated for years and finally made their way into Ohio law. What has changed for employment claims under the amended Ohio Civil Rights Act?

OHIO ADOPTS THE SERIES LLC: Implementation of Ohio’s Revised Limited Liability Company Act is Coming

On January 7, 2021, Ohio adopted S.B. 276. The new legislation establishes the Ohio Revised Limited Liability Company Act (“ORLLCA”) which effectively replaces the current Ohio LLC Act. ORLLCA will be fully effective as of January 2022. While the new law contains numerous changes to the existing LLC landscape, below is an overview of some of the key differences under the ORLLCA.

Will Federal Legislation Open Cannabis Acquisition Floodgate?

Are potential buyers quietly lobbying at federal and state levels to kick open the door to launch a new round of strategic acquisitions? Will presently pending federal legislation, the SAFE and MORE Acts, providing safe harbor for banks and re- or de-scheduling marijuana, be sufficient to mobilize into action major non-cannabis companies that previously shunned the cannabis industry due to the unknown implications of owning businesses whose activities are illegal under federal law?