Client Alerts, News Articles & Blog Posts

Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

CLIENT ALERT: Bureau of Workers' Compensation Budget Amends Law

As we head into 2018, you should be aware of some recent changes made in Ohio’s laws concerning Workers’ Compensation. These changes became effective September 29, 2017.   Some will affect business more than others, but these are changes you should really know about. 

>A notice of intent to settle can be filed by the Injured Worker or Employer within thirty (30) days of receipt of an order being appealed (or, apparently which could be appealed), or the Industrial Commission’s refusal to hear an appeal. If filed, this filing extends the time for filing an appeal to Court to one-hundred and fifty (150) days (unless the other party files an objection to the notice within fourteen (14) days of receipt). This provision may assist parties in settling claims before invoking judicial machinery.

>Changes increased Injured Worker Attorney fees from $4,500.00 to $5,000.00.

>The BWC medical section is required to schedule a medical examination to determine the employee’s continued entitlement to initial compensation no later than thirty (30) days following the initial consecutive ninety (90) day period.   While the BWC may waive the scheduling of a medical examination for “good cause,” if the employee’s employer objects to the waiver, then the administrator will refer the employee to the bureau medical section to schedule the examination or the administrator will schedule the examination.

>Section 4123.56(E) provides that if an injured worker is awarded temporary total disability compensation before the full weekly wage is determined, s/he will be compensated at the statewide average weekly wage rate.  Discrepancies will be accounted for and adjusted once the full weekly wage is calculated.

>A Permanent Partial Disability Application (C92) will be dismissed (without prejudice, which means it can be refiled if the statute has not already run) if the injured worker fails to respond to an attempt to schedule an examination by the bureau medical section or fails to attend a scheduled medical exam without notice or explanation.

>Various provisions amend sections which address fire fighter cancer presumption.  Changes to this the section, among other things, amend the fire fighter cancer presumption to permit rebutting the presumption by demonstrating that exposure to the carcinogen could not have caused that type of cancer.  Changes to this section also limit the presumption to situations where the fire fighter has not worked in hazardous duty for more than fifteen (15) years.  Other changes  permit a fire fighter to receive working wage loss if s/he has a scheduled claim for cancer contracted by a fire fighter.

>The time limit for filing a claim is reduced from two years to one year.  It is important to note, however, that the statute of limitations for occupational disease claims has apparently not changed.

>Also, while not a legislative change, an important new medical rule goes into effect January 1, 2018.  A section of the Ohio Administrative Code will be enacted, which covers Lumbar Fusions.  Under this new rule, before approving lumbar fusion surgery, certain medical criteria generally must be met.

For more information about the law changes or other employment, labor and workers' compensation matters, contact Richard L. Williger

Changes to Physician Assistant Statutes in Florida

In the last year, there have been many changes to the scope of practice and collaboration/supervision requirements for advanced practice providers such as APRNs and physician assistants in the state of Florida. In a previous Client Alert we discussed House Bill 607, which expanded the autonomous practice of APRNs providing primary care services in Florida.

Ohio Senate Bill 49 – Ohio Expands Lien Rights for Design Professionals

Effective September 30, 2021, Ohio granted limited lien rights to design professionals, including architects, landscape architects, engineers, and surveyors. Ohio Governor Mike DeWine signed Senate Bill 49 into law on July 1, 2021. This new law established a statutory right to lien commercial real estate by Ohio design professionals who, until now, could not file a lien for non-payment of professional services. Senator Vernon Sykes, a primary sponsor of Senate Bill 49, stated that the “legislation ensures that architects, engineers and other designers will get paid for their work, regardless of the outcome of their projects . . . It will support hardworking Ohioans by protecting the value of their labor . . ..”

Primary Care Practice Officially Defined in Florida for APRNs Practicing Autonomously

As many providers in Florida are aware, House Bill 607 (the “Bill”), which was passed in February of last year, gives certain APRNs in Florida the ability to practice autonomously. The only catch is that they must work in primary practice. When the Bill was initially passed, there was question as to what was exactly considered primary care, absent a definition from the Florida Board of Nursing. However, as of February 25, 2021, “primary care practice” has officially been defined.

Part II of the No Surprises Act

The Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) published Part II of the No Surprises Act on September 30, 2021, which will take effect on January 1, 2022. The new guidance, in large part, focuses on the independent dispute resolution process that was briefly mentioned in Part I of the Act. In addition, there is now guidance on good faith estimate requirements, the patient-provider dispute resolution processes, and added external review provisions.

Safer Federal Workforce Task Force - Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors

The Safer Federal Workforce Task Force has issued its Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors (Guidance). Note that the Guidance applies only to “covered contracts,” which are contracts that include the clause (Clause) set forth in Sec. 2(a) of Executive Order 14042 (Ensuring Adequate COVID Safety Protocols for Federal Contractors). The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council (FARC) is to conduct rulemaking and take related action to ensure that the Clause is incorporated into federal contracts. Until that happens, federal contractors likely will not see the Clause in its contracts. Following is a broad summary of the Guidance.