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CLIENT ALERT: IRS Announces 401(k) and HSA Contribution Limits for 2020

With 2020 just around the corner, the IRS announced important information for the upcoming year for both 401(k) Contributions and Health Saving Accounts (HSAs).

401(k) Contribution limits for 2020

Employee 401(k) contributions for 2020 will increase by $500 to $19,500, while the total for employer plus employee contribution limit increases by $1,000 to $57,000.

For participants ages 50 and over, the "catch-up" contribution limit will rise to $6,500, up by $500.

HSA Contribution limits for 2020

The annual limit on deductible contributions is $3,550 for individuals with self-only coverage under an HDHP (a $50 increase from 2019) and $7,100 for family coverage (a $100 increase from 2019).

The limits on annual deductibles are also subject to annual inflation adjustments. For 2020, the lower limit on the annual deductible for an HDHP is $1,400 for self-only coverage and $2,800 for family coverage, both increased from 2019. The upper limit for out-of-pocket expenses is $6,900 for self-only coverage and $13,800 for family coverage, both increased from 2019

The new limits will take effect January 1, 2020, HR and payroll managers should plan to adjust their systems for the new year and inform employees about the new limits - especially for those with a year-end open enrollment.

For questions about your 401(k) Plan or Health Savings Accounts, the recent changes to IRS Contribution Limits, or any other Tax questions, please contact Priscilla A. Grant, Esq.

 

 

Vaccination Considerations for Employers

Today, three Covid-19 vaccines have tested as highly effective (90%+ efficacy) and are advancing in the process for emergency use. This is especially welcome news in Ohio, which has skyrocketing cases and our strategic response has been to turn the entire state into the small town of Bomont with strict curfews and bans on social gatherings.

Did You Receive More than $750,000 in Provider Relief Funds?

The Provider Relief Funds (“PRF”) - authorized under the CARES Act - has been a vital tool for health care providers during the COVID-19 public health emergency. These funds have allowed providers to stay open and continue to offer care during these pressing times. While helpful, these funds do come with several important obligations. First, fund recipients are required to comply with certain record-keeping requirements as well as comply with certain balance billing prohibitions. See our Client Alert. Second, fund recipients are required to report their intent, use of funds, and other data elements, which helps promote transparency to the federal government. Please see our Client Alert on provider relief fund reporting requirements. Third, and perhaps a new concept for many providers, fund recipients of more than $750,000 must undergo a “single audit” to ensure program compliance and appropriate use of funds.

Important Updates Every Provider Should Know: Information Blocking

In December 2016, Congress passed the 21st Century Cures Act (“Cures Act”) which: (1) authorized funding for the National Institutes of Health to promote medical research and drug development, (2) implemented provisions aimed at addressing the prevention and treatment of mental illness and substance abuse, and (3) reformed certain standards of the Medicare program and federal tax laws to foster healthcare access and quality improvement.

PPP Update: Loan Necessity Questionnaires

On October 26, 2020, the Small Business Administration (“SBA”) published a notice in the Federal Register which foreshadowed the release of two new forms seeking information from for-profit and nonprofit organizations that received Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loans of $2 million or more. If approved, the SBA would use information from these forms to evaluate and determine whether economic uncertainty made a PPP loan request necessary.

Exposure to COVID-19 Flow Chart

Exposure to COVID-19 Flow Chart