Client Alerts, News Articles & Blog Posts

Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

IRS Provides Guidance for Payroll Tax Deferrals and Credits

Delay of Payment of Payroll Taxes Penalty and Interest Relief

                Under the CARES Act, provision was made for the delay in the payment of the employer portion of the Social Security, Medicare, and Railroad Retirement taxes for wages accrued during the period beginning March 27, 2020 and ending December 31, 2020. Instead of being due on the regular due date for the employer to deposit the taxes, one-half of the employer portion of the taxes for that period would be due on December 31, 2021, and the remaining one-half on December 31, 2022. Employers and self- employed individuals are both eligible for this relief provided they have not had indebtedness forgiven under either Sections 1106 or 1109 of the CARES Act. 

                What was not addressed was the imposition of interest and penalty for failure to make timely deposits of payroll taxes. This was resolved in Notice 2020-22 which was released on March 31, 2020.  Provided the employer pays the amounts by the due dates (December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2022), no penalty or interest will be imposed. However, this does not relieve the employer of making timely deposit of all employee withheld taxes and filing the quarterly Form 941.  

Advance Payment of Employer Credits Due to COVID-19

                On March 31, 2020, the IRS also released Form 7200, Advance Payment of Employer Credits Due to COVID-19. This form allows employers (but not self-employed individuals) who are eligible for tax credits for qualified sick and qualified family leave wages as well as the employee retention credit to request an advance payment of the credits that they will claim on the Form 941, 943, 944 series or Form CT-1. 

                This form may be filed for an advance payment of any credits that an employer anticipates receiving before the end of the month following that quarter.  Simply put, you must file this Form before you file the appropriate quarterly tax reporting form that you normally file.  It is important to remember not to file to request an advance payment for any anticipated credits if you have already reduced your deposits for those amounts. Of particular note is that Form 72 MUST be fax filed to (855) 248-0552.

Date Clarification for Payments Eligible for Qualified Sick and Qualified Family Leave Under FFCRA

                The IRS has also released Notice 2020-21 which states that the official dates between which wages earned (not paid) during the period April 1, 2020, and December 1, 2020, are those which are eligible for the credit. It was further stated in the FAQs on the IRS website that it is the date they are earned or accrued and not the date that the actual payment is made which is key. Therefore, the actual payment may occur in January 2021, but still be an eligible amount. 

For questions, or more information, please contact BMD Tax Member Priscilla Grant at pag@bmdllc.com or 330.253.5934.

The Future of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

Over the last year we all have had to adjust to the new normal ushered in by the coronavirus pandemic. Schools and daycares closed, businesses transitioned from in-office work to work from home, bars and restaurants have closed their doors...all to slow the spread and try to prevent this pandemic from spiraling out of control. The start of the pandemic was utter pandemonium. Working parents trying to balance both caring for their now at-home children and their livelihood. Businesses trying to decide how to implement leave policies with limited information. Employees determining if they could financially afford to take time off. We were all flying by the seat of our pants trying to adjust to our new normal.

Ohio Supreme Court Clarifies Medical Statute of Limitations

The Ohio Supreme Court issued a decision in late December that clarifies and finalizes the Ohio law regarding the period of time in which patients can assert claims for medical malpractice. The Court was examining the interplay between three different statutes being the statute of limitations, the statute of repose, and the savings statute.

Ohio Hospitals and Healthcare Clinics: It’s Time to Revisit Your Billing and Collection Practices

According to a recent Cuyahoga County case, certain healthcare entities may not be protected from liability when engaging in unfair or deceptive billing acts. This decision is consistent with the growing trend across the country to encourage price transparency and eliminate unfair surprise billing practices by health care organizations. Now is the time for hospitals and other health care organizations to revisit their billing and collection policies and procedures to confirm that they are legally defensible and consistent with best practices.

HIPAA Business Associate Agreements: Why These Contracts Matter

No one loves drafting, reading or negotiating HIPAA Business Associate Agreements (BAAs). Yet many of us need to do so, and some of us do so daily. They are often boring, dense and technical, but BAAs are important from both a legal and a business perspective, and they deserve our attention. Failure to enter a BAA when one is required can constitute a HIPAA violation that results in substantial liability, as demonstrated by certain recent Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) settlements.1 A business associate who makes a disclosure that is not authorized by the applicable BAA or required by law can be subject to civil and, in some cases, criminal penalties. Further, parties are often presented with BAAs that contain onerous one-sided indemnification and other provisions that can be devasting to an organization in the event of a HIPAA breach. The significance of a BAA is often not fully understood by the parties until something goes wrong (e.g., a HIPAA security incident or breach, an Office of Civil Rights (OCR) audit or a fracture in the relationship between the parties) and, at that point, there is limited opportunity to mitigate legal and business risk. Ideally, attention should be given at the commencement of the business associate relationship, when the parties are able, to thoughtfully addressing regulatory requirements, planning and preparing for potential adverse events and appropriately allocating risk among the parties. As with most healthcare regulatory compliance initiatives, a proactive approach with respect to BAAs is preferable. This article provides a broad overview of certain BAA requirements and some practical negotiating tips for the parties involved.

“I’m Out Of Here!” Now What?

We all know that the healthcare industry is experiencing a wave of integration. This trend has been evident for many years. Fewer physicians are willing to assume the legal, financial and other business risks associated with owning their own practices. More and more physicians, including anesthesiologists, are becoming employed by large physician groups, health systems and national providers. This shift necessarily involves not only entry into new employment arrangements but also the termination of existing relationships. And those terminations are often governed by written employment agreements, state and federal healthcare laws and employer benefit plans and other policies and procedures. Before pursuing their next opportunity, physicians should pause for a moment and first attend to the arrangement that they are leaving. Departing physicians need to understand their legal rights and obligations when leaving their current employment relationships in order to avoid unintended consequences and detrimental missteps along the way. Here are a few words of practical advice for physicians contemplating an exit from their current employment arrangements.