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New York, Kansas, Massachusetts, and Delaware Become the latest States to Adopt Full Practice Authority for Nurse Practitioners

Client Alert

While the COVID-19 pandemic certainly created many obstacles and hardships, it also created many opportunities to try doing things differently. This can be seen in the instant rise of remote work opportunities, telehealth visits, and virtual meetings. Many States took the challenges of the pandemic and turned them into an opportunity to adjust the regulations governing licensed professionals, including for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). 

On April 15, 2022, Kansas became the latest state to remove practice restrictions on nurse practitioners and allow them to practice completely independent of any regulatorily mandated contractual relationship with a physician. This was very shortly after similar changes were made in New York, Massachusetts, and Delaware. In total, 26 States, the District of Columbia, and two U.S. territories (Guam and Northern Mariana Islands) now permit nurse practitioners to practice without any mandated collaborative agreement or supervision. Many other States, including Ohio, are currently evaluating legislation to implement full practice authority for APRNs. A map illustrating the current position of all U.S. States and territories regarding full practice authority can be found here.

It should be noted that each full practice authority State is different with regards to the requirements to practice independently. For example, some States require a transition to practice period where the APRN practices under supervision or regulatory collaboration for a minimum period of time before being licensed to practice independently.

The trend towards adopting full practice authority for APRNs will have a direct impact on the number of patient care roles that will be filled by APRNs. Over the course of seven years (as reported in 2020), the number of nurse practitioners in the U.S. more than doubled. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Labor expects the number of jobs held by nurse practitioners, CRNAs, and certified nurse midwives to increase 45% between 2020 and 2030.

If you have questions about APRN practice rules or starting an APRN-driven business, please don’t hesitate to contact Jeana Singleton by email at: jmsingleton@bmdllc.com, or by phone at: (330) 253-2001 or another member of the Health Law Department at Brennan, Manna & Diamond.


Patient Abandonment and Termination

Healthcare professionals have a responsibility to patients with whom they have established a treatment relationship. However, there may be some instances when they will need to terminate their relationship with a patient. FAQs for patient abandonment and termination are provided to help guide physicians.

A Business or Person Who Owes You Money Has Filed for Bankruptcy. Now What?

When you receive a notice that someone you do business with has filed for bankruptcy, it is important to act quickly to determine your rights in the bankruptcy process and to protect them. Here are seven things to do right away.

Recent Litigation Challenges the Affordable Care Act Preventive Services Requirement

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has been met with numerous legal challenges. The most recent legal challenge, Braidwood Management Inc. v. Becerra, could affect millions of people covered by private health insurance.

340C – Prospective Legislation to Protect Federally Qualified Health Centers

Advocates for Community Health (ACH), an organization created to implement policy and advocacy initiatives for health care systems across the United States, has begun drafting legislation that is geared towards protecting Federally Qualified Health Centers (“FQHCs”) enrolled in the 340B Program, which is being dubbed “340C.”

Getting Paid to Vote

Can you get paid to vote? Election Day is upon us and employees across the country are asking whether they can get paid to vote. Essentially, can they take paid leave of a few hours to go to the polling location to cast their vote in a midterm election or presidential election. Well, it depends on the state where the employee works.