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Ohio Enacts Substantial Changes to Employment Discrimination Laws

In January, Governor Mike DeWine signed into law the Employment Law Uniformity Act, amending the employment protections in the Ohio Civil Rights Act in several significant ways. Such changes to the state’s anti-discrimination and anti-harassment laws have been considered and debated for years and finally made their way into Ohio law.

What has changed for employment claims under the amended Ohio Civil Rights Act?

  • Statute of Limitations: The statute of limitations for employment discrimination claims has been reduced from 6 to 2 years, bringing Ohio in line with federal law.
  • Administrative Remedies: Prior to filing suit in court alleging employment discrimination, individuals must first exhaust administrative remedies by filing a charge with the Ohio Civil Rights Commission and obtaining a right-to-sue-letter. Filing a charge tolls the statute of limitations during pendency and for 60 days after closure of the charge. The deadline to file a charge has been expanded from 180 days to 2 years after the alleged discrimination.
  • Supervisor Liability: Personal liability for supervisors, managers, and coworkers for discrimination or harassment has been eliminated except in limited circumstances. This brings state law more in line with federal and will likely curtail a very common practice by plaintiffs' attorneys in Ohio of suing supervisors in their individual capacity.
  • Sexual Harassment Defense: The employer’s affirmative defense for sexual harassment claims has been codified and mirrors the Faragher/Ellerth affirmative defense established by the U.S. Supreme Court and already recognized by Ohio courts. An employer may assert an affirmative defense against hostile work environment sexual harassment claims if it had anti-harassment policies and complaint procedures in place, and the employee unreasonably failed to take advantage of them. This defense is not available if the harassment was committed by a supervisor and also resulted in a tangible employment action such as firing, demotion, etc.
  • Age Discrimination: The Employment Law Uniformity Act has also simplified the tangled web of age discrimination claims that existed in Ohio, which had varying statutes of limitations, administrative exhaustion requirements, and remedies. The characteristics of age discrimination claims have been harmonized with other employment claims under the Ohio Civil Rights Act.

When do the changes go into effect?

  • The Employment Law Uniformity Act becomes effective April 15, 2021.

What actions should employers take now?

  • The most important thing Ohio employers need to do as a result of these amendments is review their policies and procedures to ensure that they have anti-harassment provisions and reporting procedures in place and provide training to their employees. Effective policies, procedures, and training can help prevent sexual harassment in the workplace, ensure prompt action when a complaint arises, and mitigate liability if legal action ensues.  

The Labor and Employment team at BMD is available to assist if you have questions related to these important developments. For more information, please contact Employment and Labor Law Attorney Russell Rendall at 216.658.2205 or rtrendall@bmdllc.com.

El Contrato Escrito: La Herramienta Predilecta

No existe mejor herramienta a una disputa contractual que un documento firmado por las partes en el cual se expongan las obligaciones y acuerdos entre éstas.

New State Budget Institutes Licensure Requirement for Ohio’s Hospitals

On July 1, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine signed Ohio’s final budget codified at Ohio Revised Code 3722.01 et seq., which includes a new licensing requirement for Ohio’s hospitals. For years, Ohio was the only state in the country that did not license its hospitals. This approach will now be replaced with new, detailed requirements that will require careful review and compliance. Here are some of the highlights concerning these new changes:

Healthcare Provisions in the Ohio FY 22-23 Budget

Governor Mike DeWine signed Ohio’s Fiscal Year 2022-2023 budget bill (HB 110) into law on July 1, 2021. At almost 1,000 pages and 74.1 billion dollars, the budget lays out the State’s spending for the next two years. Below are a few highlighted provisions from the budget that will be important for the healthcare industry in Ohio

Interim Final Rule for Surprise Billing

In an effort to implement the new bipartisan No Surprises Act, on July 1, 2021, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), along with the Departments of Labor and Treasury, issued an interim final rule to safeguard patients against unforeseen medical bills arising from out-of-network care.

President Biden Seeks to Limit Non-Compete Agreements

Today, President Biden announced he would issue an Executive Order that calls on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to adopt rules to curtail worker non-compete agreements. Interestingly, a week ago, the FTC approved changes to its Rules of Practice to modernize and expedite the way it issues Trade Regulation Rules. If you have followed our alerts, we predicted the elimination of non-competes would probably happen. In 2016, then-Vice President Biden was a vocal opponent against non-compete agreements. He led the Obama administration’s initiative seeking to limit or eliminate non-compete agreements. In his presidential campaign, Biden promised to “work with Congress to eliminate all non-compete agreements, except the very few that are absolutely necessary to protect a narrowly defined category of trade secrets . . ..”