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S.B. 263 Protects 340B Covered Entities from Predatory Practices in Ohio

Client Alert

Just before the end of calendar year 2020 and at the end of its two-year legislative session, the Ohio General Assembly passed Senate Bill 263, which prohibits insurance companies and pharmacy benefit managers (“PBMs”) from imposing on 340B Covered Entities discriminatory pricing and other contract terms. This is a win for safety net providers and the people they serve, as 340B savings are crucial to their ability to provide high quality, affordable programs and services to patients.

What is the 340B program?

The 340B program provides discounts on outpatient prescription and over-the-counter drugs to certain safety net health providers, called Covered Entities (“CEs”). The program's intent is to stretch scarce federal resources by allowing CEs to increase patient services with the savings realized from participation in the 340B program. Federally Qualified Health Centers (“FQHCs”), FQHC Look-Alikes, Ryan White Clinics, and Disproportionate Share Hospitals are CEs. CEs typically save 18-50% on outpatient drug costs through participation in the program. CEs use 340B savings to provide needed services – such as behavioral health, dental, case management and enhanced pharmacy management – to the most underserved Ohioans such as those who literally cannot afford to pay for health care services.

How does the 340B program work?

Section 340B(a)(1) of the Public Health Service Act requires that the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services enter into a pharmaceutical pricing agreement (“PPA”) with each manufacturer of covered outpatient drugs. Through the PPA manufacturers agree to charge a price for covered outpatient drugs that will not exceed an amount determined under the statute. This is known as the 340B ceiling price. The PPA “shall require that the manufacturer offer each covered entity covered outpatient drugs for purchase at or below the applicable ceiling price if such drug is made available to any other purchaser at any price.”[1] 

What does this mean in the context of SB 263?

SB 263 stops a practice negatively affecting 340B Covered Entities – insurance companies and PBMs diverting funding intended to care for underserved patients and communities to increase their profit margins. This happens when insurance companies and PBMs target 340B providers with discriminatory contracts – contracts that absorb all or part of the savings earned by 340B providers. They do this by reducing reimbursement and/or adding fees not applicable to non-340B providers, and then forcing CEs to either sign the contract or not be able serve patients in their network. Despite insurance companies and PBMs being aware that CEs depend on 340B savings to serve every patient who walks in its doors, regardless of ability to pay, they continue to offer discriminatory contracts to CEs. This practice isn’t just theoretical. One real-life example of a Payor/CE contract includes language that explicitly reimburses the CE more than 30 times less for a 340B brand name drug than for a retail brand name drug. In this same real-life example, not only does the Payor reimburse the CE significantly less for 340B drugs, it entirely wipes out the 340B savings intended for the Covered Entity, as provided in federal law.

The passage of SB 263 will help to end the predatory contracting practices of PBMs and insurance companies and was vital for CEs that rely on 340B savings. For questions about the 340B program or SB 263 please reach out to healthcare attorney Daphne Kackloudis at dlkackloudis@bmdllc.com.

For an update on federal actions being taken to reduce predatory practices of PBMs, see BMD Healthcare and Hospital Law Member Jeana Singleton's article HHS Issues Opinion Regarding Illegal Attempts by Drug Manufacturers to Deny 340B Discounts under Contract Pharmacy Arrangements.

[1] https://www.hrsa.gov/opa/manufacturers/index.html


Valley National Bank/Trulieve Loan: A Big Step Out of the Shadows

In a late December press release, Trulieve announced that it had secured a $71.5 million commercial bank loan. In addition to the amount of the loan, which may be the largest commercial bank loan to date to a cannabis company, the release prominently identified Valley Bank and featured both a quote from Valley’s Senior Vice President, John Myers, and a description of the Bank’s service platform and commitment to the cannabis industry.

The End of Non-Competes? The Impact It Will Have on the Healthcare Industry

On January 5, 2023, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) announced a proposed rule that, if enacted, will ban employers from entering into non-compete clauses with workers (the “Rule”), and the Rule would void existing non-compete agreements. In their Notice, the FTC stated that if the Rule were to go into effect, they estimate the overall earnings of employees in the United States could increase by $250 billion to $296 billion per year. The Rule would also require employers to rescind non-competes that they had already entered into with their workers. For purposes of the Rule, the FTC has defined “worker” to also include any employees, interns, volunteers, and contractors.”

2022 Healthcare Recap and 2023 Healthcare Check-Up

As the country begins to return to a new “normal” following the COVID-19 pandemic, there are many healthcare rules changing on both the federal and state levels as a result. Thus, it is important for healthcare providers and their employers to be aware of these changing rules, and any implications they may have on their practice. Look back on healthcare in 2022 and find a checklist for 2023.

Direct Support Professional Retention Payments

On December 15, the Ohio Senate and House passed House Bill 45, which authorizes the Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), in conjunction with the county boards of developmental disabilities, to launch their initiative to issue retention payments to Direct Support Professionals (DSPs). These retention payments will be distributed quarterly to participating home and community-based waiver providers to address the workforce crisis in the direct provider sector. Governor DeWine needs to sign the Bill to begin the payments, but he is expected to do so by the end of 2022.

Real Estate Investors Position for 2023 Opportunities

Real estate investors weathered another year in a post-pandemic world, with the year closing with yet another interest rate increase coupled with both uncertainty and heightened interest carrying into 2023. Just last Wednesday, the Federal Reserve raised its benchmark interest rate 0.50 percentage points, shifting the target range to 4.25% to 4.50%. The new level is the highest the fed funds rate has been since December 2007 and marks the seventh rate hike this year. So what does this mean to investors, brokers, lenders, and others in the real estate world? Read a few perspectives below from stakeholders familiar with our BMD clients and the markets in which they do business.