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Senate Bill 39 Allows Up to $100 Million in Business Incentive Credits for Transformational Mixed-Use Development in the State of Ohio

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine signed Senate Bill 39 on December 29, 2020, which created a new tax credit applicable to insurance premium taxes. This tax credit is designed to provide funding for a transformational mixed-use development or “TMUD” in the state of Ohio.

Effective as of March 31, 2021, Senate Bill 39 authorizes the Ohio Tax Credit Authority (“OTCA”), within the Ohio Development Services Agency (“ODSA”), to award up to $100 million of total business incentive credits in each of the fiscal years 2020-2023, which will then be applied against insurance premium taxes. Individual projects are capped at $40 million. Of the $100 million, there remains a reserved amount of $20 million of such credits each fiscal year for projects not located within a “Major City”, which is within ten miles of a municipality with more than 100,000 people.           

What Qualifies as a TMUD Project?

According to O.R.C. 122.09, the development project may be certified as a TMUD by meeting the following requirements:

  1. Must consist of new construction or redevelopment, rehabilitation, or expansion of an existing vacant structure, or a combination of the two; and
  2. Must have a “transformational economic impact” on the site and surrounding area. Transformational economic impact can be measured through the estimated increased tax collections resulting from the increased activity of the development, which must exceed 10% of the development costs within five (5) years of certification (as measured by a preliminary economic impact study, although not yet defined); and
  3. Must be mixed-use (integrating some combination of retail, office, residential, recreation, structured parking, or other similar uses); and
  4. Must include a structure or structures that meet certain height, square footage, or increased payroll requirements (urban projects must include at least one new or previously vacant building that is a) at least 15 stories high, or b) has a floor area of at least 350,000 square feet, or c) after completion will be the site of employment accounting for at least $4 million in annual payroll, or d) includes two or more connected buildings that collectively have a floor area exceeding 350,000 square feet); and
  5. Cannot be completed unless the applicant receives the credit; and
  6. Must have estimated development costs exceeding $50 million if the project is located within ten miles of a Major City.

Who Can Apply?

Those who may apply for these TMUDs include either a) property owners, or b) insurance companies that contribute capital which is then used in the planning or construction of this type of eligible development. Insurance companies may ultimately claim this credit, as it is a credit against an entity’s Ohio insurance premium taxes. A property owner who originally applies and receives the TMUD credit may either transfer it to an insurance company or sell or transfer the rights to that credit to others in order to raise project capital.

What’s Next?

The state is currently undertaking rulemaking for this new incentive and developing program guidelines. These guidelines, as defined by the Director of ODSA, are expected to be released within the next 30 days. All TMUD projects must be certified by the OTCA by June 30, 2023.

For additional questions on this tax credit, please contact BMD Member Jason Butterworth at jabutterworth@bmdllc.com or (330) 374-3216.

COVID, Privacy and More! New Challenges for Physicians in 2021

While hopefully we are coming out of the pandemic, the legal repercussions related to legislative initiatives and other actions during that time continue to apply to businesses in general and healthcare practices. It is a helpful reminder that practices make certain that they maintain accurate records in order to satisfy the reporting requirements under the various COVID-related bills and protect yourself from future employment claims.

Banking and Cannabis: Bank Lending, The Next Frontier

A fortuitous combination of developments and circumstances present the banking and cannabis industries a large opportunity to enhance each of their respective bottom lines: conventional bank lending, payment processing, treasury management and other services, and bank administered SBA and revenue bond financing to cannabis businesses.

EKRA Updates: COVID-19 Testing, Employment Agreements, and More

Ever since the Eliminating Kickbacks in Recovery Act (“EKRA”) was passed by Congress in 2018, we have been waiting to see how the law is interpreted and ultimately enforced. As a reminder, EKRA seeks to eliminate kickbacks in return for patient referrals to facilities that treat those overcoming addiction, such as recovery homes, clinical treatment centers, and laboratories. (NOTE: EKRA applies to all laboratories, not just those related to addiction treatment.) It is essentially an expansion of the Anti-Kickback Statute, which only applies to those services that are reimbursable through federal healthcare programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, to now also cover services reimbursable through private insurers.

New Interpretation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act Rocks the Industry

It’s not lost on us that our interpretation of § 1692c(b) runs the risk of upsetting the status quo in the debt-collection industry. This quote from the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeal in its April 21, 2021 opinion from the case of Hunstein v. Preferred Collection and Management Services, Inc. is possibly the biggest understatement in the history of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. At a minimum, the Eleventh Circuit’s opinion has sent shockwaves and fear throughout multiple sectors of the financial services industry.

Construction Industry Trends and Predictions Through 2021 and Beyond: Insurance and Emerging Threats

A 2021 survey identified three key issues impacting the construction industry in 2021: (1) the financial health of contractors; (2) the continuing risk of the pandemic; and (3) technology driving productivity, but also increasing the risk of cybersecurity threats. With this backdrop, insurance premiums in the construction industry are generally on the rise in 2021.