Client Alerts, News Articles & Blog Posts

Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

State of Ohio & Cities Extend Tax Filing Deadline

On March 27, Governor DeWine signed a bill passed by the legislature to provide tax relief to Ohio taxpayers. 

Filing Relief

The law provides that taxpayers will have until July 15, 2020 (as opposed to April 15), to file and pay both any balance due on their 2019 income and school district taxes as well as the first and second estimated payments (April 15 and June 15) that is due. This extension is automatic and neither penalties nor interest will be assessed on these amounts.  However, if you are a net profits filer for city tax purposes and your federal return was filed by March 16, 2020, the extension IS NOT automatic, and you must file an extension to receive additional time. Because city tax filing deadlines are tied to the State filing deadline, cities should not have to take any further action. Many cities in Ohio have already posted the extended filing date on their websites. 

Withholding Changes for City Income Taxes

Also, part of the law is a change in the way employers calculate city income tax withholding. Employers are normally required to withhold city income taxes from wages for any municipality in which an employee spent 20 or more days working during a calendar year. This change provides that employees who are working from “a temporary location” (most notably their home) shall be treated as if they are working at their normal principal place of work. Thus, employers are able to withhold city taxes as if the employee were actually working in their normal location(s).

Commercial Activity Tax

Finally, the Tax Commissioner has been granted the authority to extend the due date for the filing of the Commercial Activity Tax (CAT) due on May 11, 2020. At the time of this release, no new extended date has been announced.

What It Is Not

There is no extension to file and/or pay sales tax. Of course, businesses that are closed due to any of the Orders issued by the State would, except for the month of March, only have a filing requirement as they would have made no taxable sales.

Other States

Some other states have released guidance as to relief that they are granting taxpayers. The most up-to-date information for this is available on the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants website.

For more information or questions, please contact Priscilla A. Grant, BMD Business, Corporate and Tax Member at pag@bmdllc.com or 330.253.5934.

El Contrato Escrito: La Herramienta Predilecta

No existe mejor herramienta a una disputa contractual que un documento firmado por las partes en el cual se expongan las obligaciones y acuerdos entre éstas.

New State Budget Institutes Licensure Requirement for Ohio’s Hospitals

On July 1, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine signed Ohio’s final budget codified at Ohio Revised Code 3722.01 et seq., which includes a new licensing requirement for Ohio’s hospitals. For years, Ohio was the only state in the country that did not license its hospitals. This approach will now be replaced with new, detailed requirements that will require careful review and compliance. Here are some of the highlights concerning these new changes:

Healthcare Provisions in the Ohio FY 22-23 Budget

Governor Mike DeWine signed Ohio’s Fiscal Year 2022-2023 budget bill (HB 110) into law on July 1, 2021. At almost 1,000 pages and 74.1 billion dollars, the budget lays out the State’s spending for the next two years. Below are a few highlighted provisions from the budget that will be important for the healthcare industry in Ohio

Interim Final Rule for Surprise Billing

In an effort to implement the new bipartisan No Surprises Act, on July 1, 2021, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), along with the Departments of Labor and Treasury, issued an interim final rule to safeguard patients against unforeseen medical bills arising from out-of-network care.

President Biden Seeks to Limit Non-Compete Agreements

Today, President Biden announced he would issue an Executive Order that calls on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to adopt rules to curtail worker non-compete agreements. Interestingly, a week ago, the FTC approved changes to its Rules of Practice to modernize and expedite the way it issues Trade Regulation Rules. If you have followed our alerts, we predicted the elimination of non-competes would probably happen. In 2016, then-Vice President Biden was a vocal opponent against non-compete agreements. He led the Obama administration’s initiative seeking to limit or eliminate non-compete agreements. In his presidential campaign, Biden promised to “work with Congress to eliminate all non-compete agreements, except the very few that are absolutely necessary to protect a narrowly defined category of trade secrets . . ..”