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The Reasoning Behind Governor DeWine's $775 Million Budget Reduction

This week, Governor DeWine announced $775 million in cuts to the state operating budget due to financial repercussions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Reductions –The DeWine administration will reduce General Revenue Fund spending by $775 million between now and the end of the state fiscal year (June). The following reductions will be made for the next two months:

  • Medicaid: $210 million
  • K12 Foundation Payment Reduction: $300 million
  • Other Education Budget Line Items: $55 million
  • Higher Education: $110 million
  • All Other Agencies: $100 million

Recent Timeline The state is required by statute to have a balanced budget each biennium. As Ohio enters month 11 of its 24-month budget, the motivation to balance the budget is forcing the cuts. In making his announcement, the Governor chronologically broke down how Ohio arrived at its present condition:

  • February, the state was running $200 million above budget estimates;
  • April, the state was forced to shut down to mitigate COVID-19;
  • As of May 6, 2020, the state is $776.9 million in the red; and
  • He expects the state to continue to experience budgetary concerns for months. 

The ReasoningGovernor DeWine anchored his reasoning to future-facing concerns. He cautioned that, “[w]hile we do not know what the coming months will hold, COVID is here with us and will be here for months to come.” He hedged his possible cautionary actions by pointing to his unwillingness to draw from the Rainy Day Fund for the rest of this fiscal year (two months), but will likely need to tap the budget stabilization fund in the next fiscal year beginning in July. 

On MedicaidThe Governor said that cuts to Medicaid will not come at the cost of essential services, and that he believes they will be able to find savings within the system even as the state responds to the COVID-19 pandemic. Subsequently, the Director of the Office of Budget and Management indicated that much of the Medicaid cuts will be achieved as an adjustment to Medicaid managed care plan rates.

For more, contact Daphne L. Kackloudis 614.246.7508, dlkackloudis@bmdllc.com.

New NIL Opportunities for Student-Athletes Require Diligent Review

On June 28, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine signed Executive Order 2021-10D, “Establishing the Duties of Colleges and Universities as to Name, Image, and Likeness Compensation of Student-Athletes.” The Executive Order was motivated by the passage of similar name, image, and likeness (“NIL”) regulations in seventeen (17) other states; Ohio followed suit to avoid a significant competitive disadvantage in attracting student-athletes to the state.

Tax Savings Potentially on the Chopping Block under President Biden’s American Jobs Plan and American Families Plan

Recently, President Biden has proposed several tax law changes in his American Jobs Plan and American Families Plan. Outlined below, are a few of the tax savings that could be significantly changed or eliminated under Biden’s plans.

Here are the Final Candidates for Mayor of Cleveland

Earlier this year, current Cleveland Mayor, Frank Jackson, announced he would not run for re-election this fall. With no need to beat an incumbent, the Cleveland mayoral race suddenly became competitive. Thirteen individuals declared their intent to run for mayor. The City of Cleveland, however, has a difficult qualification requirement to run: 3,000 valid signatures from Cleveland residents. The deadline to file a petition to run, with the 3,000 valid signatures, had to be submitted by June 16 (yesterday).

What Happens to a Pandemic Stimulus Payment Upon Death?

On January 1, 2021, the federal government issued stimulus payments (also known as Economic Impact Payments) to American citizens – on paper. However, many of the stimulus payments were not received until several months later. Sometimes the stimulus payments did not arrive until after an individual died.

The Masks Are Back: New OSHA Regulations for Healthcare Employers

Employment Law After Hours is back with a News Break Episode. Yesterday, OSHA published new rules for healthcare facilities, including hospitals, home health employers, nursing homes, ambulance companies, and assisted living facilities. These new rules are very cumbersome, requiring mask wearing for all employees, even those that are vaccinated. The only exception is for fully vaccinated employees (2 weeks post final dose) who are in a "well-defined" area where there is no reasonable expectation that any person with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 will be present.