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Time to Update Your HIPAA Compliance Plan for Telehealth Policies and Procedures

Client Alert

The delivery of healthcare in this country may be forever changed following the COVID-19 pandemic. Providing services through telehealth technologies initially allowed providers to connect with patients in a safe and socially distant manner and helped keep vital hospital beds free for COVID-19 care. Now, while still a safe, socially distant option, telehealth allows patients to access healthcare services in an efficient manner, decreases the likelihood of cancellations, and expands access to services that do not require an in-person encounter (i.e., surgery, procedure, or test). Telehealth is now widely reimbursed by both federal and commercial payors and more provider types are able to provide telehealth services within their licensed scope of practice.

While the use of technology by both providers and patients is now commonplace in the industry, protected health information (PHI) must be safe and secure. Providers are still obligated to keep PHI confidential and comply with the rules and requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). An increased frequency of technology introduces another avenue for potential risk and unauthorized uses or disclosures of PHI.

At the start of the COVID-19 public health emergency, the Office of Civil Rights (OCR), responsible for enforcing HIPAA, issued a notice of enforcement discretion to not impose penalties against healthcare providers for noncompliance with the regulatory requirements under HIPAA in connection with the good faith provision of telehealth through the duration of the national emergency. As of September 8, 2020, this enforcement discretion is still in place. It will not remain forever and enforcement actions are still at the decision of the OCR. Therefore, in a world with an increased use of technology for healthcare services and the risk of more unauthorized uses or disclosures of PHI, providers should still comply with all of the HIPAA rules and regulations and incorporate telehealth in a compliance plan and/or HIPAA policies and procedures.

The Healthcare and Hospital Law Department at Brennan Manna & Diamond, LLC is here to help account for telehealth and the increased use of technology in your current HIPAA compliance plan to ensure the safety and privacy of the PHI you create and/or maintain. The BMD team can help your practice mitigate risk in the ever changing healthcare delivery world. 

 


House Bill 249: Key Updates to Involuntary Hospitalization Law for Mental Health Providers

House Bill 249 (HB 249) proposes changes to Ohio Revised Code (ORC) Sections 5122.01 and 5122.10 to expand the conditions under which a person with a mental illness can be involuntarily hospitalized.

Starting an Advanced Practice Provider Practice

Advanced practice providers (APPs), which includes non-physician providers such as nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and nurse anesthetists, commonly start their own healthcare practices. Practices may provide, for example, service offerings such as primary care, anesthesiology, mental health, and aesthetics (medical spas). However, there are a number of considerations and steps that must be taken for APPs to compliantly function independently.

FTC Increases Targeting of Companies Lacking Cyber Protection

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently released a comprehensive cybersecurity report outlining key findings and recommendations based on emerging threats, trends in data breaches, and strategies for businesses to enhance their cybersecurity posture observed over the last year.

New Federal Medical Conscience Rule and Its Implications

The Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights issued a Final Rule to clarify protections for healthcare providers who refuse services based on religious or moral beliefs. This includes protection against discrimination for refusing procedures like assisted suicide or abortion. The OCR can receive complaints, conduct investigations, and enforce these protections. Entities are encouraged to update policies accordingly and display a model notice provided by the OCR.

Marijuana Reclassification and APRN/PA Prescribing

Marijuana is expected to be reclassified by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) from a Schedule I controlled substance to a Schedule III controlled substance as a result of efforts by the Biden administration.