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UPDATED: Impact Payment Breakdown: How Much Will I Get, When Will I Get It and What Do I Need to Do?

UPDATED: The IRS announced that Social Security beneficiaries who are not typically required to file a tax return will not need to file a return to receive the economic impact payments. These payments will automatically be deposited into their bank accounts. This only applies to individuals receiving social security. Other individuals who typically do not file a tax return will still need to submit a return in order to receive the economic impact payment.

In a recent announcement, the IRS stated that the economic impact payments will begin being sent within the next three weeks. These payments will be distributed automatically and no action is needed by most taxpayers.

How much is the economic impact payment?
The full economic impact payment is $1,200 for individuals, $2,400 for married filing joint couples, and $500 for each qualifying child. 

Taxpayers who are above the income limits will see a lower economic impact payment. The economic impact payments are reduced by $5 for every $100 above the income limit thresholds. Individuals with an adjusted gross income above $99,000 and married filing joint couples with no children and an adjusted gross income above $198,000 are not eligible for an economic impact payment. 

Who is eligible for the economic impact payment?
Individuals with an adjusted gross income up to $75,000 and married filing joint couples with adjusted gross income up to $150,000 will receive the full payment. The economic impact payment begins to phase-out above these income thresholds and individuals with an adjusted gross income above $99,000 and married filing joint couples with no children and an adjusted gross income above $198,000 are not eligible for an economic impact payment. 

How will the IRS determine the amount of my economic impact payment?
For individuals who have already filed their 2019 tax return, the IRS will use that tax return to calculate the economic impact payment.

For individuals who have not filed their 2019 tax return yet, the IRS will use information from their 2018 tax return to calculate the economic impact payment.

How do I receive an economic impact payment if I am not required to file a return?
Individuals who are not required to file a return may still be able to receive economic impact payment. However, in order to receive an economic impact payment, the individuals must file a tax return. Individuals who are Social Security beneficiaries who are not typically required to file a tax return will not need to file a return to receive the economic impact payments. These payments will automatically be deposited into their bank accounts. This only applies to individuals receiving social security.

How will I receive the economic impact payment?
The IRS will direct deposit the economic impact payment into the same bank account reflected on the individual’s most recent return. 

The IRS does not have my bank account information, can I still receive the economic impact payment?
Yes. The IRS is currently working on implementing a web-based portal for individuals to provide their bank account information to the IRS. In the absence of the IRS having bank account information, a paper check will be issued for the economic impact payment.

How long is the economic impact payment available?
The economic impact payment is available throughout the rest of 2020. Therefore, if you have not filed a tax return for 2018 or 2019, you can still receive the economic impact payment when you file. However, the IRS encourages individuals to file their tax returns as soon as possible. 

For additional questions related to the economic impact payment or assistance filing your tax return, please contact BMD Tax Law Attorney Tracy Albanese at tlalbanese@bmdllc.com or (330) 253-9195.

Lockdowns, Landlords, & Litigation: Abercrombie & Fitch Flips The Script on Simon Property Group Inc.

Novel litigation between commercial property owners and tenants arises from COVID-19 lockdowns. Typically, owners sue for nonpayment of rent. But in Franklin County, Ohio, a large retail tenant turned the tables and sued the owner to recoup payments.

UPDATE: Ohio Businesses Remain Required to Post Exceptions to State-Wide Mask Mandate at All Entrances

On August 1, 2020, Lance D. Himes, Interim Director of the Ohio Department of Health, issued an amended order continuing the requirement that Ohio businesses post at all entrances any permitted exceptions they provide to customers, patrons, visitors, contractors, vendors and similar individuals to use facial coverings.

2020 Marcum National Construction Survey Marks a New, Post-Pandemic Construction Environment

The results of the 2020 Marcum National Construction Survey are in, and the construction industry’s outlook for the remainder of 2020 and beginning of 2021 remains cautiously optimistic despite the COVID-19 global pandemic. Ability to find skilled labor, healthcare expenses, and material costs remain the top concerns for the industry, while “lack of future work” joins the list.

Wrongful Death Lawsuits in the Wake of COVID-19

Several major “essential business” employers, including Walmart and Tyson, have been served with wrongful death lawsuits in relation to COVID-19. As many Ohio employees begin to return to work, employers should be prudent in following workplace safety practices.

We are Working in a Virtual, Video-Conferencing World – But What About Wiretapping?

Businesses and other organizations often have a need or desire to record telephone conversations related to their business interests and customer dealings; however, this practice is not always permissible as federal and state laws vary on this issue. Knowing and understanding your jurisdiction’s rules and regulations on this practice is essential to remaining in compliance with the law.