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Wrongful Death Lawsuits in the Wake of COVID-19

Client Alert

Several major “essential business” employers, including Walmart and Tyson, have been served with wrongful death lawsuits in relation to COVID-19. As many Ohio employees begin to return to work, employers should be prudent in following workplace safety practices.

Walmart. In early April, a Walmart retail employee’s family filed a lawsuit against Walmart in Cook County, Illinois (Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois Case No. 2020L003938) following the employee’s death after contracting COVID-19. The lawsuit filed by the employee’s family accuses Walmart of negligence and wrongful death in violation of Illinois law. The Complaint alleges that Walmart did not follow guidelines issued by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and U.S. Department of Labor for maintaining safe workplaces. It is alleged, among other things, that Walmart failed to enforce social distancing, properly cleanse and sanitize, provide PPE including masks, latex gloves, or antibacterial wipes to employees, and further failed to send COVID-19 exposed employees home until cleared by a medical professional.

Tyson. In May, a Tyson employee’s family filed a lawsuit against Tyson in the Northern District of Texas (U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas Case No. 2:20-cv-00125-Z) after the employee suffered a work-related injury, contracted COVID-19, and died. The lawsuit filed by the family accuses Tyson of failing to provide employees with appropriate personal equipment, and further alleging that “a grossly disproportionate number of Tyson employees have contracted COVID-19, and have died, compared to the population as a whole.” The lawsuit was later voluntarily dismissed by the employee’s family on June 5, 2020.

As employees continue to return to work, employers should focus on preventative measures to keep employees safe and healthy to avoid having to defend against any personal injury or wrongful death lawsuits. Some of the best practices related to workplace safety concerning COVID-19 include:

  1. Following the CDC’s Interim Guidance for Businesses, including best practices for cleaning and disinfecting areas in the workplace, social distancing, and quarantining employees who have confirmed their exposure to COVID-19.
  2. If and when an employee has a confirmed case of COVID-19, send the employee home preferably until they are released by a medical professional, or at least until they are able to meet the requirements for ending home isolation.
  3. If and when an employee has a confirmed case of COVID-19, work to quickly determine all other employees and/or third parties who might have been exposed to the COVID-19 positive employee. The CDC Contact Tracing Guidelines provide that in order to best determine other employees who were at highest risk to COVID-19 exposure, employers should ask the following question: Who worked within 6 feet of the sick employee, for 15 minutes or more, within the 48 hours prior to the sick employee showing symptoms? This has been referred to as the “6-15-48” Rule. Once identified, the CDC recommends that 6-15-48 employees of non-critical business self-quarantine for 14 days after their last potential exposure, maintain social distance, and self-monitor symptoms.
  4. Stay apprised on the changes and updates issued by the CDC and share with your employees. Educating and engaging employees is key. Continue to remind employees of COVID-19 symptoms and urge them to seek medical attention if COVID-19 symptoms appear. For employees who are isolated, the employer should check in with the employee at least once a week.
  5. If there is a confirmed case of COVID-19 in the workplace, inform employees immediately. Although there is no case law requiring employers to inform employees of confirmed cases, erring on the side of transparency will help best conform with OSHA’s general duty clause, which requires employers to maintain a safe work environment.

For questions, or more information, please contact your primary BMD attorney.


Valley National Bank/Trulieve Loan: A Big Step Out of the Shadows

In a late December press release, Trulieve announced that it had secured a $71.5 million commercial bank loan. In addition to the amount of the loan, which may be the largest commercial bank loan to date to a cannabis company, the release prominently identified Valley Bank and featured both a quote from Valley’s Senior Vice President, John Myers, and a description of the Bank’s service platform and commitment to the cannabis industry.

The End of Non-Competes? The Impact It Will Have on the Healthcare Industry

On January 5, 2023, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) announced a proposed rule that, if enacted, will ban employers from entering into non-compete clauses with workers (the “Rule”), and the Rule would void existing non-compete agreements. In their Notice, the FTC stated that if the Rule were to go into effect, they estimate the overall earnings of employees in the United States could increase by $250 billion to $296 billion per year. The Rule would also require employers to rescind non-competes that they had already entered into with their workers. For purposes of the Rule, the FTC has defined “worker” to also include any employees, interns, volunteers, and contractors.”

2022 Healthcare Recap and 2023 Healthcare Check-Up

As the country begins to return to a new “normal” following the COVID-19 pandemic, there are many healthcare rules changing on both the federal and state levels as a result. Thus, it is important for healthcare providers and their employers to be aware of these changing rules, and any implications they may have on their practice. Look back on healthcare in 2022 and find a checklist for 2023.

Direct Support Professional Retention Payments

On December 15, the Ohio Senate and House passed House Bill 45, which authorizes the Department of Developmental Disabilities (DODD), in conjunction with the county boards of developmental disabilities, to launch their initiative to issue retention payments to Direct Support Professionals (DSPs). These retention payments will be distributed quarterly to participating home and community-based waiver providers to address the workforce crisis in the direct provider sector. Governor DeWine needs to sign the Bill to begin the payments, but he is expected to do so by the end of 2022.

Real Estate Investors Position for 2023 Opportunities

Real estate investors weathered another year in a post-pandemic world, with the year closing with yet another interest rate increase coupled with both uncertainty and heightened interest carrying into 2023. Just last Wednesday, the Federal Reserve raised its benchmark interest rate 0.50 percentage points, shifting the target range to 4.25% to 4.50%. The new level is the highest the fed funds rate has been since December 2007 and marks the seventh rate hike this year. So what does this mean to investors, brokers, lenders, and others in the real estate world? Read a few perspectives below from stakeholders familiar with our BMD clients and the markets in which they do business.