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Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

Employment Law After Hours VIDEO - Working Off the Clock: Laws Requiring Payment for Work Performed After Shift Ends

Do employees get paid when they work off the clock after the end of their scheduled shift? What if an employee answers emails or text messages after work? Do companies or employers have to pay employees for answering emails or text messages at home? Do employers or companies have to pay for de minimis work time? Do you have to pay exempt (salary) employees for working from home? Do you have to pay non-exempt employees for working from home? Do companies have to pay overtime for working from home? These questions are answered by the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, which requires that non-exempt employees be paid at least minimum wage (and possibly overtime) for all hours worked, regardless of where and when those hours are worked. Always remember to check specific state laws regarding employee payments in your state.

Your Workplace Under Biden

This is my favorite recurring post – Predictions of How a New Administration Will Affect Your Workplace. Four years ago, we accurately called the emasculation of the 2016 proposed FLSA Overtime Rules (the salary exemption threshold was set at $35,568 in 2019, rather than $47,476 as proposed), we forecasted a conservative shift of the NLRB and its results (a roll-back of employee rights, social media policy evaluations, and joint employer rules), and we nailed the likelihood of multiple conservative appointments to the United States Supreme Court and its long-term effects (although I completely failed to predict that my ND classmate Amy Coney Barrett would fill the final vacancy during the Trump administration). This time, the L+E Practice of BMD has decided to make it a group effort at predicting what will happen, what probably happen, and what might happen under President Biden. As always, please save this in your important files and pull it out four (or eight) years from now to judge our accuracy.

CLIENT ALERT: New Overtime Rule Raises Minimum Salary Requirements and Other Changes to the Fair Labor Standards Act

Today, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued its Final Rule updating the regulations under the Fair Labor Standard Act: Effective January 1, 2020, employees who make less than $35,568 are now eligible for overtime pay under a final rule issued by the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”). The DOL expects 1.3 million workers to become newly eligible for overtime by updating the thresholds. The new rule will raise the salary threshold to $684 per week ($35,568 annualized) from $455 per week. This means that even if your employee qualifies under one of the overtime exemptions, if the employee is not earning at least $684/week, the employee will be eligible for overtime and minimum wage requirements.