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CLIENT ALERT: IRS Announces 401(k) and HSA Contribution Limits for 2020

With 2020 just around the corner, the IRS announced important information for the upcoming year for both 401(k) Contributions and Health Saving Accounts (HSAs).

401(k) Contribution limits for 2020

Employee 401(k) contributions for 2020 will increase by $500 to $19,500, while the total for employer plus employee contribution limit increases by $1,000 to $57,000.

For participants ages 50 and over, the "catch-up" contribution limit will rise to $6,500, up by $500.

HSA Contribution limits for 2020

The annual limit on deductible contributions is $3,550 for individuals with self-only coverage under an HDHP (a $50 increase from 2019) and $7,100 for family coverage (a $100 increase from 2019).

The limits on annual deductibles are also subject to annual inflation adjustments. For 2020, the lower limit on the annual deductible for an HDHP is $1,400 for self-only coverage and $2,800 for family coverage, both increased from 2019. The upper limit for out-of-pocket expenses is $6,900 for self-only coverage and $13,800 for family coverage, both increased from 2019

The new limits will take effect January 1, 2020, HR and payroll managers should plan to adjust their systems for the new year and inform employees about the new limits - especially for those with a year-end open enrollment.

For questions about your 401(k) Plan or Health Savings Accounts, the recent changes to IRS Contribution Limits, or any other Tax questions, please contact Priscilla A. Grant, Esq.

 

 

Title VII to Protect LGBTQ Community

It is not every day that the United States Supreme Court issues a decision that dramatically changes the workplace, but it happened this week. In a landmark decision captioned as Bostock v. Clayton County, issued by the Court on June 15th, the Court ruled that federal law prohibiting discrimination on the basis of “sex” will now include protections for individuals on the basis of sexual orientation, transgender, and gender identity.

Update: President Trump Signs Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act of 2020

On June 3, 2020, Congress updated the CARES Act by passing the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act of 2020 (“FA”). The legislation, which has not yet been signed into law by President Trump, would provide more flexibility to small businesses who received loans under the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”).

Workers’ Compensation Claims and COVID-19

Can one of my employees file a workers’ compensation claim if they claim that they contracted coronavirus at work? We get that question a lot. Yes, they can, but you should oppose any application for coverage if you receive one. Generally, the claim will not be granted unless the employee has a job that poses a special hazard or risk of exposure to the virus and the employee can prove that he or she contracted the virus at work.

Ohio State Dental Board Implements Teledentistry Rules

Ohio law defines “teledentistry” as the delivery of dental services through the use of synchronous, real-time communication and the delivery of services of a dental hygienist or expanded function dental auxiliary pursuant to a dentist’s authorization.[1] The law requires a dentist who desires to provide dental services through teledentistry to apply for a teledentistry permit from the Ohio State Dental Board (“OSDB”).[2] Pursuant to the mandate under Ohio Revised Code 4715.436, the OSDB is implementing the following teledentistry permit rules and requirements (to be set forth under Ohio Administrative Code Chapter 4715-23). These regulations, which were subject of a public hearing on February 19, 2020, are effective on May 30, 2020.

HHS Addresses Drug Manufacturer Coupons on Out-of-Pocket Limits

On May 7, 2020, the US Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) announced their Notice of Benefit Parameters for 2021 in which HHS addressed the application of prescription drug manufacturer copay coupons towards a patient’s out-of-pocket limit. Under this guidance, HHS will permit, but not require, plans and insurers to count direct support offered to enrollees by drug manufacturers (i.e., coupons) for specific prescription drugs toward the annual limits on cost-sharing, regardless of whether a generic equivalent is available.