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COVID-19 & Your Construction Business - A Triage Checklist

Many business operations are shutting down at an alarming pace. The coronavirus (“COVID-19”) pandemic is already impacting the construction industry and creating uncertainty for the progress of current and future projects. Small/mid-size businesses may not be in financial position to sustain prolonged economic revenue declines. Navigating the next few months will be vital in preserving existing business relationships and planning for future business when the conditions improve. BMD offers some practical advice to manage risks and take reasonable precautions during this pandemic.

The following checklist is designed to help you identify prudent actions so you can successfully navigate the unknown:

Prioritize the Health and Welfare of Your Employees and Clients:

  • Make sure your employees, contractors, suppliers and facilities are safe and smart - forced quarantine will result in labor shortages and shutdowns
  • Over-communicate about best safety practices with employees and clients
  • Assess current projects and enforce heightened safety obligations
    • Ongoing projects in medical facilities? Nursing homes? Schools?
    • Mandatory temperature testing prior to entering healthcare facilities
    • Daily questionnaires regarding potential safety basics
    • Anything from washing hands to properly shielding coughs
  • Consult the CDC and/or State departments of health for guidance.
    Ex: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/workplace-school-and-home-guidance.pdf

Run Your Business:

  • Create and enforce an effective company policy approved by your employment attorney
  • Internal communications are vitally important
    • Promote safe practices in the workplace
    • Identify essential staff and functions
    • Prepare, equip and train staff to work remotely, if possible or if deemed mandatory
  • Review Employment Policies and enact emergency policies, if necessary
      • Sick leave
      • Family medical leave
      • Performance expectations
      • Protocol for working remotely

Evaluate Current Projects:

  • Prioritize clients and proper allocation of resources for projects
  • Evaluate availability of workforce, now and in the future when workers become ill
  • Evaluate supply chain impact on materials and supplies
    • Inventory and ration materials where possible
    •  

Review Your Contracts:

  • Review current contracts
  • Do not assume you have an ‘out’
    • Not all construction contracts have ‘force majeure’ provisions
    • Consult §8.3.1 of the AIA A201 regarding circumstances that may be commonly described or accepted as ‘force majeure’ events
  • Consider negotiating a modification of existing contracts and key terms
    • Consult §1.1.1, 1.1.2, 2.5, 3.11, 4.1.2, 4.2.1, 5.2.3, 7, 8.3.1, 9.7, 10.3.2 of the AIA A201 regarding modification
      • Contract duration
      • The goods/services involved in the contract
        • Adding or subtracting goods/services covered in the contract
      • The payment terms
      • The delivery terms
  • Determine notification requirements if performance is impossible or impractical and you are seeking to delay or excuse performance
    • §15.1.6 and §15.1.3 of the AIA A201 provides guidance on claims for delay
  • Do not ‘Self Help’ or bury your head in the sand
    • Communication and transparency are vital
    • Be pro-active and reasonable

Review Your Insurance Policy:

  • Coverage for the treatment of infected employees
  • Coverage for lawsuits filed by employees or other parties relating to COVID-19 exposure
  • Coverage for loss of revenue associated with epidemics, pandemics, and viruses such as COVID-19, governmental shutdown, or limitation of access to an insured’s business
  • Loss of earnings caused by delays or government (foreign or domestic) actions
  • Provide proper written notice of claims to avoid waiver of rights

If you have any questions, or for more information, please contact any member of the BMD Real Estate or Construction Law teams.

Florida’s “Stay-at-Home” Order and What it Means for Businesses

On April 1, 2020, in response to the State’s ongoing efforts to fight the spread of COVID-19, Governor Ron DeSantis issued Executive Order 20-91, which is State-wide “Stay-at-Home” Order. The Order goes into effect Friday, April 3, 2020 at 12:01 a.m., and expires on April 30, 2020, unless extended by subsequent order (the full text of the order is available here).

CMS Offers New Stark Waivers and More Flexibility to Health Care Providers Due to COVID-19

On March 30, 2020, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued several temporary regulatory waivers to further enable the American healthcare system to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic with more efficiency and flexibility. The official publication can be found here: Physicians and Other Clinicians: CMS Flexibilities to Fight COVID-19.

#CancelRent – What’s Next for Landlords?

Across the country, residential tenants, small businesses, and even national retailers such as Cheesecake Factory, Subway, and Mattress Firm have declared war on their landlords by refusing to pay rent on account of the Covid-19 pandemic (“COVID-19”). This has sent shockwaves through the real-estate industry. As of April 1st, residential tenants owe an estimated $40 Billion in rent. Estimates for the commercial sector are not far off. So far, federal, state, and local measures have focused on providing relief to residential and commercial tenants and even to some commercial landlords.

Record Keeping Requirements to Receive FFCRA IRS Tax Credit

On April 1, 2020, the IRS and Department of Labor issued temporary regulations to provide clarity regarding the documents required by employees requesting leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) and the documentation that employers need to maintain.

Eviction & Foreclosure During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Like most areas of our society, the COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted the business relationships between landlords and tenants and between lenders and borrowers. In most states, non-essential retailers and other businesses have closed their doors and are doing business online, to the extent that they can. Some businesses, like The Cheesecake Factory, have announced that they would not be paying rent at any of their locations for at least a month due to the pandemic. Landlords and homeowners are concerned about being able to pay their mortgages and tenants are concerned about being able paying their rent.