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COVID-19 & Your Construction Business - A Triage Checklist

Many business operations are shutting down at an alarming pace. The coronavirus (“COVID-19”) pandemic is already impacting the construction industry and creating uncertainty for the progress of current and future projects. Small/mid-size businesses may not be in financial position to sustain prolonged economic revenue declines. Navigating the next few months will be vital in preserving existing business relationships and planning for future business when the conditions improve. BMD offers some practical advice to manage risks and take reasonable precautions during this pandemic.

The following checklist is designed to help you identify prudent actions so you can successfully navigate the unknown:

Prioritize the Health and Welfare of Your Employees and Clients:

  • Make sure your employees, contractors, suppliers and facilities are safe and smart - forced quarantine will result in labor shortages and shutdowns
  • Over-communicate about best safety practices with employees and clients
  • Assess current projects and enforce heightened safety obligations
    • Ongoing projects in medical facilities? Nursing homes? Schools?
    • Mandatory temperature testing prior to entering healthcare facilities
    • Daily questionnaires regarding potential safety basics
    • Anything from washing hands to properly shielding coughs
  • Consult the CDC and/or State departments of health for guidance.
    Ex: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/workplace-school-and-home-guidance.pdf

Run Your Business:

  • Create and enforce an effective company policy approved by your employment attorney
  • Internal communications are vitally important
    • Promote safe practices in the workplace
    • Identify essential staff and functions
    • Prepare, equip and train staff to work remotely, if possible or if deemed mandatory
  • Review Employment Policies and enact emergency policies, if necessary
      • Sick leave
      • Family medical leave
      • Performance expectations
      • Protocol for working remotely

Evaluate Current Projects:

  • Prioritize clients and proper allocation of resources for projects
  • Evaluate availability of workforce, now and in the future when workers become ill
  • Evaluate supply chain impact on materials and supplies
    • Inventory and ration materials where possible
    •  

Review Your Contracts:

  • Review current contracts
  • Do not assume you have an ‘out’
    • Not all construction contracts have ‘force majeure’ provisions
    • Consult §8.3.1 of the AIA A201 regarding circumstances that may be commonly described or accepted as ‘force majeure’ events
  • Consider negotiating a modification of existing contracts and key terms
    • Consult §1.1.1, 1.1.2, 2.5, 3.11, 4.1.2, 4.2.1, 5.2.3, 7, 8.3.1, 9.7, 10.3.2 of the AIA A201 regarding modification
      • Contract duration
      • The goods/services involved in the contract
        • Adding or subtracting goods/services covered in the contract
      • The payment terms
      • The delivery terms
  • Determine notification requirements if performance is impossible or impractical and you are seeking to delay or excuse performance
    • §15.1.6 and §15.1.3 of the AIA A201 provides guidance on claims for delay
  • Do not ‘Self Help’ or bury your head in the sand
    • Communication and transparency are vital
    • Be pro-active and reasonable

Review Your Insurance Policy:

  • Coverage for the treatment of infected employees
  • Coverage for lawsuits filed by employees or other parties relating to COVID-19 exposure
  • Coverage for loss of revenue associated with epidemics, pandemics, and viruses such as COVID-19, governmental shutdown, or limitation of access to an insured’s business
  • Loss of earnings caused by delays or government (foreign or domestic) actions
  • Provide proper written notice of claims to avoid waiver of rights

If you have any questions, or for more information, please contact any member of the BMD Real Estate or Construction Law teams.

El Contrato Escrito: La Herramienta Predilecta

No existe mejor herramienta a una disputa contractual que un documento firmado por las partes en el cual se expongan las obligaciones y acuerdos entre éstas.

New State Budget Institutes Licensure Requirement for Ohio’s Hospitals

On July 1, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine signed Ohio’s final budget codified at Ohio Revised Code 3722.01 et seq., which includes a new licensing requirement for Ohio’s hospitals. For years, Ohio was the only state in the country that did not license its hospitals. This approach will now be replaced with new, detailed requirements that will require careful review and compliance. Here are some of the highlights concerning these new changes:

Healthcare Provisions in the Ohio FY 22-23 Budget

Governor Mike DeWine signed Ohio’s Fiscal Year 2022-2023 budget bill (HB 110) into law on July 1, 2021. At almost 1,000 pages and 74.1 billion dollars, the budget lays out the State’s spending for the next two years. Below are a few highlighted provisions from the budget that will be important for the healthcare industry in Ohio

Interim Final Rule for Surprise Billing

In an effort to implement the new bipartisan No Surprises Act, on July 1, 2021, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), along with the Departments of Labor and Treasury, issued an interim final rule to safeguard patients against unforeseen medical bills arising from out-of-network care.

President Biden Seeks to Limit Non-Compete Agreements

Today, President Biden announced he would issue an Executive Order that calls on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to adopt rules to curtail worker non-compete agreements. Interestingly, a week ago, the FTC approved changes to its Rules of Practice to modernize and expedite the way it issues Trade Regulation Rules. If you have followed our alerts, we predicted the elimination of non-competes would probably happen. In 2016, then-Vice President Biden was a vocal opponent against non-compete agreements. He led the Obama administration’s initiative seeking to limit or eliminate non-compete agreements. In his presidential campaign, Biden promised to “work with Congress to eliminate all non-compete agreements, except the very few that are absolutely necessary to protect a narrowly defined category of trade secrets . . ..”