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Ohio Court Operations and Access During the Coronavirus Crisis

On March 19, 2020, Ohio Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor gave an update on the State Judicial Branch’s response to the coronavirus crisis at a press conference held by Governor Mike DeWine. As of the date of this update, individual courts within the State of Ohio have the authority to issue their own emergency procedures regarding court access, trials, hearings and filings during the coronavirus pandemic. Most municipal, county and appellate courts throughout Ohio have already issued orders changing the procedures to be followed until further notice.  The Ohio Judicial Conference has an extensive list of links to these temporary local court rule changes at: http://www.ohiojudges.org/Resources/covid-19-emergency-planning

Although Chief Justice O’Connor is allowing local courts to determine how to operate in their communities’ best interests for the time-being, she has provided significant guidance on issues the courts should be considering, including:

  • The total closure of the court system in Ohio is not an option since it would prevent access to justice.
  • Courts must especially remain open to address criminal, emergency and time-sensitive matters.
  • Jury pools and the level of public traffic in courthouses should be reduced.
  • Judges should consider lowering bonds and issuing summonses instead of ordering arrests, depending upon the severity of the crimes at issue.
  • Hearings should be held by video or telephone conference when possible.
  • Clerks of Courts should remain open to allow for public filings.

It is important to emphasize that Ohio courts are still in operation during this time, and in most instances, there will still be ways to address whatever legal issues you are facing through the Judicial System.  If you have a pending court case, it is highly recommended that you discuss the court’s current procedures with your attorney and also discuss how these changes could impact your case practically and strategically.  Some questions which might arise, include:

Is my civil trial likely to go forward as scheduled?  Many local courts have postponed civil trials for 30 days or more, but you should consult with your attorney.

Should I appear in person for my hearing? Many hearings, such as pretrials and non-emergency hearings, are being conducted by the courts by telephone or videoconference.  However, hearings that involve evidence will still likely require a court appearance by you and/or your attorney.  You will want to ask your attorney how the court is handling your particular hearing.

Has my foreclosure or eviction been put on hold? Chief Justice O’Connor has recommended that foreclosure sales and evictions for non-payment of rent be put on hold temporarily, but this is still at the discretion of the local courts.  An eviction for an issue other than non-payment of rent will likely not be put on hold by your local court.  The Department of Housing and Urban Development has placed a hold on foreclosures of mortgages backed by the federal government until the end of April 2020 and some banks are also placing a temporary stay on their foreclosure filings.  Contact your attorney or bank with questions.

Do the deadlines that were previously set in my case still apply?  Yes.  All deadlines for answers, motions, discovery cutoffs and other time-limits still apply unless you or your attorney ask the Court for an extension of the deadline, and it is granted.

Can I file a new case, vehicle title or other filing at the Clerk of Courts?  Clerks of Courts remain open for business throughout the State of Ohio.  You will want to call ahead to see if your filing can be received in person, by mail, or electronically.

I’ve been ordered to appear for jury duty, what should I do?  Call the juror call-in number provided on your juror summons to find out if you need to appear at the Court in person.

All of these guidelines are for municipal, county and appellate courts in Ohio only. If you have a case pending in Federal Court or in a different State, you will want to carefully check that court’s particular coronavirus response. As always, the Litigation Team at Brennan, Manna & Diamond is ready to assist and advise you with your legal needs during this difficult time.  Please do not hesitate to contact us with any questions that you might have.

Changes to Physician Assistant Statutes in Florida

In the last year, there have been many changes to the scope of practice and collaboration/supervision requirements for advanced practice providers such as APRNs and physician assistants in the state of Florida. In a previous Client Alert we discussed House Bill 607, which expanded the autonomous practice of APRNs providing primary care services in Florida.

Ohio Senate Bill 49 – Ohio Expands Lien Rights for Design Professionals

Effective September 30, 2021, Ohio granted limited lien rights to design professionals, including architects, landscape architects, engineers, and surveyors. Ohio Governor Mike DeWine signed Senate Bill 49 into law on July 1, 2021. This new law established a statutory right to lien commercial real estate by Ohio design professionals who, until now, could not file a lien for non-payment of professional services. Senator Vernon Sykes, a primary sponsor of Senate Bill 49, stated that the “legislation ensures that architects, engineers and other designers will get paid for their work, regardless of the outcome of their projects . . . It will support hardworking Ohioans by protecting the value of their labor . . ..”

Primary Care Practice Officially Defined in Florida for APRNs Practicing Autonomously

As many providers in Florida are aware, House Bill 607 (the “Bill”), which was passed in February of last year, gives certain APRNs in Florida the ability to practice autonomously. The only catch is that they must work in primary practice. When the Bill was initially passed, there was question as to what was exactly considered primary care, absent a definition from the Florida Board of Nursing. However, as of February 25, 2021, “primary care practice” has officially been defined.

Part II of the No Surprises Act

The Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) published Part II of the No Surprises Act on September 30, 2021, which will take effect on January 1, 2022. The new guidance, in large part, focuses on the independent dispute resolution process that was briefly mentioned in Part I of the Act. In addition, there is now guidance on good faith estimate requirements, the patient-provider dispute resolution processes, and added external review provisions.

Safer Federal Workforce Task Force - Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors

The Safer Federal Workforce Task Force has issued its Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors (Guidance). Note that the Guidance applies only to “covered contracts,” which are contracts that include the clause (Clause) set forth in Sec. 2(a) of Executive Order 14042 (Ensuring Adequate COVID Safety Protocols for Federal Contractors). The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council (FARC) is to conduct rulemaking and take related action to ensure that the Clause is incorporated into federal contracts. Until that happens, federal contractors likely will not see the Clause in its contracts. Following is a broad summary of the Guidance.