Client Alerts, News Articles & Blog Posts

Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

Ohio Supreme Court Liquidated Damages Analysis: Hindsight is not 2020!

In a case decided on February 24, 2016, the Ohio Supreme Court construed the enforceability of a liquidated damages provision in a public works construction contract. The Court held that when evaluating the enforceability of a liquidated damages provision in a construction contract, the court must conduct its analysis prospectively, based on the per diem amount of the liquidated damages at the time the contract is executed, and not retrospectively, based on the total amount of liquidated damages that ultimately accrue.

In reversing the Court of Appeals, the Ohio Supreme Court determined that the mere fact that the liquidated damages totaled $277,900 (calculated at $700 per day times 397 days late) did not result in a finding that the amount of liquidated damages was unreasonable where the base contract amount was $683,300. The flaw in the Court of Appeals reasoning was that it applied a retrospective analysis using hindsight. The long-standing test in Ohio requires the analysis to be considered at the time the parties entered into the contract.

The Ohio Supreme Court also held that “liquidated damages are not deemed a penalty simply because a project consists of new construction of an improvement that did not exist previously and no proof of damages is required to enforce liquidated damages pursuant to such a contract.”

This decision also includes an interesting overview of the Samson Sales tripartite test for distinguishing between an unenforceable penalty clause and a valid liquidated damages clause.

To read the Slip Op. No. 2016-Ohio-628, Boone Coleman Constr., Inc., v. Piketon, visit: http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/rod/docs/pdf/0/2016/2016-Ohio-628.pdf

Should you wish to consult with the author of this article, please feel free to contact Attorney Robert A. Hager at (330) 253–4925.

David Scott & Amanda Waesch Promoted to Vice President Roles as Part of Continued Succession Planning

Brennan, Manna and Diamond (BMD), an entrepreneurial business law firm with six offices in Ohio and Florida, has promoted Columbus Office Managing Partner David Scott and Executive Committee Member Amanda Waesch to the position of Vice President.

'Culture, Culture, Culture’: The Essence of Printing Industry M&A Deals

BMD/Signet's Tony Manna interviewed by Printing Impressions

Signet’s Anthony Manna: U.S. Deal Activity Remains Steady As China Responds To Coronavirus

“When SARS came around (in February 2003), China had about 4 percent of the global supply chain,” says Manna, founder, principal and chairman at the global private investment firm. “Now they have 16 percent, and you see this massive stimulus package being put in place to combat the coronavirus problem. China has already announced that they’re going to have more stimulus packages.”

Brennan, Manna & Diamond opens Stark office

As published in the Canton Repository, Tuesday, February 18, 2020 Akron-based law firm wants to serve existing and future Stark County customers. Summit County-based law firm Brennan Manna & Diamond has opened an office in Jackson Township.

Jeffrey C. Miller discusses "Guns and Drugs in the Workplace" at Legal Education event Feb. 20, 2020

On Thursday, February 20, 2020 at the Builder's Exchange Training Center in North Canton, Attorney Jeff Miller will be discussing guns and drugs in the workplace. Both are legal in Ohio, but what about the workplace? Jeff will discuss concealed carry and medical marijuana in the workplace, and employer options for addressing these emerging issues. In today's tight labor market, the correct policies and procedures on guns and drugs are crucial.