Resources

Client Alerts, News Articles, Blog Posts, & Multimedia

Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

Primary Care Practice Officially Defined in Florida for APRNs Practicing Autonomously

Client Alert

Overview

As many providers in Florida are aware, House Bill 607 (the “Bill”), which was passed in February of last year, gives certain APRNs in Florida the ability to practice autonomously. The only catch is that they must work in primary practice. When the Bill was initially passed, there was question as to what was exactly considered primary care, absent a definition from the Florida Board of Nursing. However, as of February 25, 2021, “primary care practice” has officially been defined.

Florida Administrative Code 64B9-4.001

Florida Statute 464.0123, which sets forth the requirements for APRN autonomous practice, states, “[a]n advanced practice registered nurse who is registered under this section may engage in autonomous practice only in primary care practice, including family medicine, general pediatrics, and general internal medicine, as defined by board rule.”

However, the Board of Nursing had not yet provided such a definition when the statute was passed, leaving APRN's confused as to whether they qualified for an autonomous practice license. In February, primary care was defined in Florida Administrative Code 64B9-4.001(12) as including, “physical and mental health promotion, assessment, evaluation, disease prevention, health maintenance, counseling, patient education, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, inclusive of behavioral and mental health conditions.” While this definition also encompasses mental health treatment, in addition to family medicine and general medicine, anything involving specialty care will still require a collaborative agreement.[1]

In Practice

The Florida Association of Nurse Practitioners further explains when an APRN’s practice is considered primary care and when it is not. For example, administering Botox may be considered primary care if the provider is using it for migraines in a primary care setting, while administering it in a MedSpa or using it for wrinkle treatment outside of a primary care setting would not be considered primary care and would require the APRN to practice pursuant to a collaboration agreement.[2]

Conclusion

It is important to note that even if an APRN is working in a primary care setting and offering primary care to their patients, they may not practice autonomously until they have applied for an autonomous license and have been approved.

If you have any questions about whether you qualify for an autonomous license in Florida, or have any other questions about the application process and requirements, please contact Amanda Waesch at alwaesch@bmdllc.com.

[1] Florida Association of Nurse Practitioners, Autonomous Practice Q&A, (Feb. 22, 2021) https://www.flanp.org/page/AutonomousPractice.

[2] Id.


Community Banks: Collaboration, not isolation, is the key to protecting/ enhancing the cannabis business you pioneered

As we prepare for the plenary session of the informal institutional cannabis lenders community announced in my previous article, I am pleased to advise that participants now include 5 of the best-known dedicated loan funds; a select group of commercial banks ranging in size from single state community banks to mid-size regionals making cannabis loans into the mid-8 figures; and, a syndicator of credit union cannabis loans.

Inflation Reduction Act: Healthcare Provisions

On August 16, 2022, President Joe Biden signed into law the Inflation Reduction Act (the “Act”), a landmark climate, healthcare, and tax bill. Though the Act’s climate provisions have received most of the media attention, the healthcare aspects of the Act present some of the most significant changes to the American healthcare system since the passage of the Affordable Care Act.

The Current State of Assignment of Benefits Litigation in Florida

On May 25, 2022, Florida lawmakers approved property insurance reforms that remove attorney’s fees, with respect to assignment of benefits (“AOB”) property insurance litigation. One-way attorney’s fees are a longstanding problem in Florida and the reforms come at a time when AOB litigation increasingly affects homeowners in a negative way.

Proposed Community Revitalization Grants for Ohio Projects

Jason A. Butterworth client alert ohio tax credits historic preservation tax credits community revitalization grants

Ohio Senate Bill 225 Paves the Way for Greater Investment in Opportunity Zones and Historic Districts

Ohio Senate Bill 225 is poised to make dramatic enhancements to certain tax credit programs in Ohio, specifically those surrounding investments in “Opportunity Funds” and historic buildings. Signed into law by Governor Mike DeWine in June 2022, the Bill is positive news for real estate developers working to revitalize Ohio communities with investment and rehabilitation projects.