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Vaccinating Against Design and Construction Risk: A COGENCE Alliance Momentum Recap

Last month, COGENCE Alliance hosted a four-day conference, attended by owners, affiliates, construction managers, trades, engineers, and architects. David Scott presented and other BMD team members hosted breakout discussions on how to “vaccinate against design and construction risk.” Groups discussed new and developing risks, how to mitigate those risks, and qualities of those who best adjusted to the new and developing risks.

Aggregated Risks in 2019. In 2019, COGENCE gathered information from the six industry segments (owners, affiliates, construction managers, trades, engineers, and architects) to first identify risks from each discrete group’s perspective. Next, COGENCE ranked the identified risks to determine which risks were most significant. Finally, COGENCE worked together across industry segments to identify habits to help mitigate risks and improve projects. The ten greatest risks aggregated across industry segments included: (1) communication; (2) contracts; (3) leadership; (4) schedule; (5) budget; (6) team members; (7) changes; (8) financial; (9) quality; and (10) due diligence.

Changing Risks with COVID-19. With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020, some of the risks identified by the various industry segments in 2019 quickly changed. Reports from breakout rooms indicated that new and different risks were resultant of the pandemic. For example, industry segments identified new risks associated with an elevated standard of care with heightened expectations and design for occupant safety, as well as new safety and sanitation protocols. Other risks included those related to cybersecurity due to increased remote work, as well as the evolution and need (or lack thereof) for space, such as physical offices.

New Risks with COVID-19. The breakout rooms also discussed how existing risks had morphed. For example, communication, the greatest risk identified pre-pandemic, posited new challenges including Zoom fatigue, complex logistics with site visits, as well as an increase in difficulty to collaborate due to a loss of “serendipitous” communications. Other changes to existing risks included budgetary concerns, particularly relating to the cost of PPE, HVAC improvements, and WELL certifications.

Mitigating New and Changing Risks. To address the new and developing risks, the breakout rooms discussed how to mitigate certain risks, which included more frontend planning, running through project stress tests (e.g. check technology and remote access), and developing more robust onboarding protocols to integrate new team members. Other mitigation plans revolved around communication, specifically ensuring consistent communication, standardizing how teams communicate (email, videoconference, phone call, text), following up after meetings, and identifying issues early and often.

Adapting to New and Changing Risks. The breakout rooms concluded by discussing those who have been most effective in adapting to the new and developing risks of the pandemic. Groups identified that those who demonstrate care and concern for their team members, as well as those willing to seek information and consequently learn and adapt had best weathered the new challenges in design and construction.

If you have questions or need more information regarding design and construction risk, please contact Construction Law Member David Scott at dmscott@bmdllc.com (614.246.7514).

El Contrato Escrito: La Herramienta Predilecta

No existe mejor herramienta a una disputa contractual que un documento firmado por las partes en el cual se expongan las obligaciones y acuerdos entre éstas.

New State Budget Institutes Licensure Requirement for Ohio’s Hospitals

On July 1, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine signed Ohio’s final budget codified at Ohio Revised Code 3722.01 et seq., which includes a new licensing requirement for Ohio’s hospitals. For years, Ohio was the only state in the country that did not license its hospitals. This approach will now be replaced with new, detailed requirements that will require careful review and compliance. Here are some of the highlights concerning these new changes:

Healthcare Provisions in the Ohio FY 22-23 Budget

Governor Mike DeWine signed Ohio’s Fiscal Year 2022-2023 budget bill (HB 110) into law on July 1, 2021. At almost 1,000 pages and 74.1 billion dollars, the budget lays out the State’s spending for the next two years. Below are a few highlighted provisions from the budget that will be important for the healthcare industry in Ohio

Interim Final Rule for Surprise Billing

In an effort to implement the new bipartisan No Surprises Act, on July 1, 2021, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), along with the Departments of Labor and Treasury, issued an interim final rule to safeguard patients against unforeseen medical bills arising from out-of-network care.

President Biden Seeks to Limit Non-Compete Agreements

Today, President Biden announced he would issue an Executive Order that calls on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to adopt rules to curtail worker non-compete agreements. Interestingly, a week ago, the FTC approved changes to its Rules of Practice to modernize and expedite the way it issues Trade Regulation Rules. If you have followed our alerts, we predicted the elimination of non-competes would probably happen. In 2016, then-Vice President Biden was a vocal opponent against non-compete agreements. He led the Obama administration’s initiative seeking to limit or eliminate non-compete agreements. In his presidential campaign, Biden promised to “work with Congress to eliminate all non-compete agreements, except the very few that are absolutely necessary to protect a narrowly defined category of trade secrets . . ..”