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Back to Work: Employer Documents

The return of the workforce brings a renewed set of documentation requirements for employers, particularly those employers with fewer than 500 employees and any companies who received PPP funds. Back in March, employers needed a COVID-19 Leave Form and a Remote Work Policy, but things have changed. 

With the ever-increasing rules, orders, interpretations, employee questions, and customer expectations, it is imperative that businesses have the necessary documents in place. 

What are the necessary documents? Companies will want to have policies and forms in place to minimize the risk of liabilities and to best manage the workforce. Because of the uncertainties around the spread of COVID-19 and its testing and treatment, companies are more at risk for an extension of liability or a regulatory intervention. 

What do we specifically need? And why? Keeping in mind the volatility of the laws, rules, and regulations, the safest practice is a Back to Work set of forms and policies to include: 

  • Return to Work Notice and Form
    With furloughs, terminations, PPP loans, and expansive unemployment, employers must track which employees are refusing to return to work, as a best practice, and to extinguish any continuing obligation to the employees. Additionally, under PPP forgiveness exception rules, businesses must maintain a written record if an employee rejects a good faith return to work, the employee was fired for cause, the employee voluntarily resigned, or the employee voluntarily requested a reduction of hours. 
  • Waiver of Liability
    The state orders regarding workforce and workplace requirements can create additional duties owed to business invitees. A Waiver of Liability for customers, while not foolproof, will provide an important line of defense to frivolous lawsuits alleging COVID-19 exposure at your business. 
  • COVID-19 Testing Consent Form
    As an established precautionary measure, employers will want to engage in some testing or results review for their employees to prevent an outbreak in the workplace. For healthcare providers, this is a recommended best practice with respect to obtaining patient consent and informing patients of the risks associated with COVID-19 when seeking treatment. A Consent Form will set out the necessary parameters for testing by both employers and healthcare providers. 
  • Childcare Leave (Summer Vacation) Form
    Under the FFCRA, employees may be eligible for Emergency Paid Childcare Leave.  However, that leave is only applicable to school and care closures due to COVID-19. It does not apply to school closures due to Summer Vacations. During the summer months, employees will need to provide supplemental information regarding their requests for Childcare Leave. 

  • Workplace Policy on COVID-19 Safety and PPE
    A top question we receive from employers is “What do we do if an employee refuses to wear a mask, wash hands, keep distance, etc.?” The Workplace Policy will address the mandatory requirements and the potential for disciplinary actions.

  •  OSHA Standards Policy
    More and more groups are calling on OSHA to implement COVID-19 safety standards beyond the General Duty Clause. As OSHA introduces federal requirements, employers must be able to implement and adapt through an OSHA Standards Policy. 
  • Internal COVID-19 Reporting Form
    When two or more employees raise a concern about workplace safety, they are arguably engaging in a “protected concerted activity” protected by the NLRA. The number of retaliation, whistleblower, and public policy claims are on the rise. It is prudent and imperative for employers to have reporting policies and procedures in place, document and investigate any COVID-19 concerns of the employees and prevent retaliation to avoid the potential claims. 
  • Away from Workplace COVID-19 Policy
    This is another major concern for employers. Even if employees are monitored at work, what can stop them from engaging in risky behaviors away from work? An off-duty conduct policy isn’t fail-safe, but it will help set expectations for employees’ actions away from work that may affect the workplace. If employees travel to hot-spot areas, or party with large groups of people, that creates risk for the employer and coworkers, and this Policy announces the employer’s right to restrict the employee from returning to work until safe from exposure.

If you need assistance with any or all of these recommended Back to Work Policies and Forms, please contact Jeffrey C. Miller at 216.658.2323 or jcmiller@bmdllc.com or Amanda L. Waesch at 330.253.9185 or alwaesch@bmdllc.com or your attorneys with Brennan Manna & Diamond. A Back to Work package will be offered to existing L+E Advisory and Healthcare Advisory clients.

Vaccination Considerations for Employers

Today, three Covid-19 vaccines have tested as highly effective (90%+ efficacy) and are advancing in the process for emergency use. This is especially welcome news in Ohio, which has skyrocketing cases and our strategic response has been to turn the entire state into the small town of Bomont with strict curfews and bans on social gatherings.

Did You Receive More than $750,000 in Provider Relief Funds?

The Provider Relief Funds (“PRF”) - authorized under the CARES Act - has been a vital tool for health care providers during the COVID-19 public health emergency. These funds have allowed providers to stay open and continue to offer care during these pressing times. While helpful, these funds do come with several important obligations. First, fund recipients are required to comply with certain record-keeping requirements as well as comply with certain balance billing prohibitions. See our Client Alert. Second, fund recipients are required to report their intent, use of funds, and other data elements, which helps promote transparency to the federal government. Please see our Client Alert on provider relief fund reporting requirements. Third, and perhaps a new concept for many providers, fund recipients of more than $750,000 must undergo a “single audit” to ensure program compliance and appropriate use of funds.

Important Updates Every Provider Should Know: Information Blocking

In December 2016, Congress passed the 21st Century Cures Act (“Cures Act”) which: (1) authorized funding for the National Institutes of Health to promote medical research and drug development, (2) implemented provisions aimed at addressing the prevention and treatment of mental illness and substance abuse, and (3) reformed certain standards of the Medicare program and federal tax laws to foster healthcare access and quality improvement.

PPP Update: Loan Necessity Questionnaires

On October 26, 2020, the Small Business Administration (“SBA”) published a notice in the Federal Register which foreshadowed the release of two new forms seeking information from for-profit and nonprofit organizations that received Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loans of $2 million or more. If approved, the SBA would use information from these forms to evaluate and determine whether economic uncertainty made a PPP loan request necessary.

Exposure to COVID-19 Flow Chart

Exposure to COVID-19 Flow Chart