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Changes to FFCRA Paid Leave: Congress’ Revisions to Employment COVID-19 Leave Benefits Signals the Light is at the End of the Tunnel

Client Alert

Late on December 27th, President Trump signed into law the government’s $900 billion COVID-19 relief package (the “Stimulus Bill”). Among other economic benefits, the Stimulus Bill implements changes to the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”).

It is still set to expire on 12/31/2020; however, employers can voluntarily extend and take advantage of payroll tax credits until March 31, 2021.

In April of 2020, the FFCRA began providing paid leave to employees who missed work as a result of an actual or suspected COVID-19 illness or to care for a child when their school or childcare service was closed because of COVID-19. For a full review of the FFCRA, please see our posts from March and April, including https://www.bmdllc.com/resources/blog/ffcra-update-implementation-date-accelerated-from-april-2-to-april-1/

In short, employees could receive up to 80 hours of paid sick leave and another 12 weeks of family leave (with 10 weeks paid). Employers received payroll tax credits/refunds for the paid leave. That law is set to expire on December 31, 2020.

The Stimulus Bill extends eligibility for employer payroll tax credits/refunds for leave payments made to employees on or before March 31, 2021 under the FFCRA, signaling to the American people that Congress believes many of the employed public will be vaccinated by this time, the light at the end of the tunnel. The Stimulus Bill does contain a caveat that employers are no longer required to provide FFCRA leave benefits after December 31, 2020, but if they do, they will receive the payroll tax credits, up to the maximums provided in the FFCRA, for payments made prior to April 1, 2021.

Below we provide a list of questions and answers we received to date following the passage of the Stimulus Bill. We expect the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) to issue additional questions and answers as the Stimulus Bill is implemented, and we will update this Client Alert as these are received.

  1. Where can I find additional information on eligible employees, eligible employers, and the maximum benefits that are eligible for reimbursement as payroll tax credits?

Answer: Please use this link to access our original publication on the specific details, requirements, and eligibility criteria for the FFCRA. https://www.bmdllc.com/resources/blog/ffcra-update-implementation-date-accelerated-from-april-2-to-april-1/

  1. Are employers required to continue to offer FFCRA COVID-19 leave benefits to employees after December 31, 2020?

Answer: No. The Stimulus Bill only extends the payroll tax credit eligibility date to March 31, 2021. Meaning, employers are not required to give FFCRA leave benefits to employees after December 31, 2020. However, if they do, employers will continue to be eligible for payroll tax refunds, up to the maximums provided, for any payments made to employees under the FFCRA between January 1, 2021 and March 31, 2021. This also means that employers may choose which parts of the FFCRA they will utilize for leave benefits. For example, employers can choose to allow employees to take sick leave under the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (“EPSLA”), but do away with the leave benefits provided under the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (“EFMLEA”). Employers will need to carefully consider which benefits they will continue to offer, if any.

  1. Should employers revise their COVID-19 employment leave policies to reflect the changes in the Stimulus Bill?

Answer: Yes. Once employers determine which leave benefits they will continue to offer, they will need to revise all COVID-19 employment leave policies to reflect these changes and their effective dates. Even if an employer will continue to offer all benefits, we recommend revising the leave policies to reflect that such benefits will automatically terminate on March 31, 2021 as this is the final date employers will be eligible to receive payroll tax credits for the leave payments made to employees.

  1. Does the Stimulus Bill provide additional leave time to employees who exhausted all previous COVID-19 leave time?

Answer: No. If employees previously exhausted all leave time under EPSLA (up to 80 hours) and EFMLEA (up to 10 weeks), they are no longer eligible for benefits under the FFCRA. Therefore, these employees will need to utilize PTO/sick time or an unpaid leave of absence if they need to miss work because of COVID-19. The only caveat to this is for employers that have Family Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”) policies. If one of these employers uses a calendar year benefit renewal, rather than a rolling year benefit renewal, employees are going to receive additional time under the FMLA beginning on January 1, 2021. Meaning, if these employers continue to allow leave under EFMLEA through March 31, 2021, employees would receive an additional 10 weeks beginning on January 1, 2021. If you have additional questions regarding this caveat, please contact us directly.

  1. Are any states implementing their own versions of COVID-19 employee leave policies that must still be followed after December 31, 2020?

Answer: The following states have implemented with specific COVID-19 employee leave laws and/or guidance. If you employ employees in these states, please consult with your employment counsel to discuss requirements under these state laws. Please also be advised that a number of large cities within these states have also implemented their own COVD-19 employee leave laws and/or guidance.

Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico (Bernalillo County only), New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas (Austin, Dallas, San Antonio only), Vermont, Washington, Washington D.C.

For questions, please contact Jeffrey Miller at jcmiller@bmdllc.com or 216.658.2323 or Bryan Meek at bmeek@bmdllc.com or 330.253.5586, or contact any member of the BMD Employment & Labor Law Practice Group.


The Ohio State University Launches Its Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

In response to Ohio’s nursing shortage, The Ohio State University College of Nursing is accepting applications for its new Accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing program (aBSN). Created for students with a bachelor’s degree in non-nursing fields, the aBSN allows such students to obtain their nursing degree within 18 months. All aBSN students will participate in high-quality coursework and gain valuable clinical experience. Upon completion of the program, graduates will be eligible to take the State Board, National Council of Licensure Exam for Registered Nursing (NCLEX-RN).

Another Transparency Obligation: The FinCEN Beneficial Ownership Information Reporting Requirements

Many physician practices and healthcare businesses are facing a new set of federal transparency requirements that require action now. The U.S. Department of Treasury Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) Beneficial Ownership Information Reporting Requirements (the “Rule”), which was promulgated pursuant to the 2021 bipartisan Corporate Transparency Act, is intended to help curb illegal finance and other impermissible activity in the United States.

“In for a Penny, in for a Pound” is No Longer the Case for Florida Lawyers

On April 1, 2024, newly adopted Rule 1.041 to the Florida Rules of Civil Procedures goes into effect which creates a procedure for an attorney to appear in a limited manner in civil proceedings.  Currently, when a Florida attorney appears in a civil proceeding, he or she is reasonable for handling all aspects of the case for their client.  This new rule authorizes an attorney to file a notice limiting the attorney’s appearance to particular proceedings or specified matters prior to any appearance before the court.  For example, an attorney can now appear for the limited purpose of filing and arguing a motion to dismiss.  Once the motion to dismiss is heard by the court, the attorney may file a notice of termination of limited appearance and will have no further obligations in the case.

Enhancing Privacy Protections for Substance Use Disorder Patient Records

On February 8, 2024, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) finalized updated rules to 42 CFR Part 2 (“Part 2”) for the protection of Substance Use Disorder (“SUD”) patient records. The updated rules reflect the requirement that the Part 2 rules be more closely aligned with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”) privacy, breach notification, and enforcement rules as mandated by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act of 2020.

Columbus, Ohio Ordinance Prohibits Employers from Inquiries into an Applicant’s Salary History

Effective March 1, 2024, Columbus employers are prohibited from inquiring into an applicant’s salary history. Specifically, the ordinance provides that it is an unlawful discriminatory practice to: