Client Alerts, News Articles & Blog Posts

Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

FDIC Provides Guidance on Loan Modifications & Workout Options for Borrowers Affected by COVID-19

On March 22, 2020, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp (FDIC) and other federal banking regulatory agencies, along with state banking regulators, the National Credit Union Administration Agency (NCUA), the regulator of credit unions, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued the Interagency Statement on Loan Modifications and Reporting by Financial Institutions Working with Customers Affected by the Coronavirus  to encourage financial institutions to work constructively with borrowers impacted by the disease and to provide additional information regarding loan modifications. In summary, the policies give lenders or bankers substantially more latitude to work with affected borrowers by softening the regulatory and accounting impact of having delinquent or restructured credit.

The Interagency Statement can be found here: https://www.fdic.gov/news/news/financial/2020/fil20022.html?mc_cid=c19ae173ad&mc_eid=fabbc3a33b

As described in the Interagency Statement, the FDIC:

  • Encourages financial institutions to work constructively with borrowers affected by COVID-19;
  • Will not criticize institutions for prudent loan modifications and will not direct supervised institutions to automatically categorize COVID-19-related loan modifications as troubled debt restructurings (TDRs);
  • Confirmed with staff of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) that short-term modifications made on a good faith basis for COVID-19 borrowers who were current prior to any COVID-19 relief are not TDRs;
  • Views that modification efforts described in the interagency statement for borrowers of one-to-four family residential mortgages where loans are prudently underwritten and not past due or carried in nonaccrual status do not result in loans being considered restructured or modified for the purpose of respective risk-based capital rules; and
  • Views prudent loan modification programs to financial institution customers affected by COVID-19 as positive actions that can effectively manage or mitigate adverse impacts on borrowers due to COVID-19, and lead to improved loan performance and reduced credit risk.

Borrowers, lenders, and other businesses should open early candid lines of communication with one another to negotiate forbearance agreements, extensions, refinancing, restructuring or other related relief. These arrangements must be documented and BMD attorneys can help you with this loan modification or workout process. 

For Ohio Businesses impacted by COVID-19, there are low-interest loans available to businesses in all Ohio counties. SBA low-interest federal disaster loans can provide up to $2 million of working capital to help Ohio business owners in overcoming temporary losses of revenue they are experiencing as a result of COVID 19. The assistance may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that cannot be paid due to economic impacts. These loans are available to small businesses and private, non-profit organizations to help alleviate economic injury caused by the coronavirus.

The following are links to the SBA programs:

Additionally, you can talk to your banker. Be proactive. Let them know you are addressing the situation and/or applying for the SBA Loan and do so immediately. While many people may ordinarily avoid contacting their banker or creditors to talk about problems, under the Interagency Statement this is a safe time to do so because everyone is experiencing the same problems.

The state of Ohio has also provided unemployment benefits for Ohio individuals impacted by COVID-19. You can access information about these benefits with the following links: Coronavirus and Unemployment Benefits Questions and Answers at: http://jfs.ohio.gov/ouio/CoronavirusAndUI/ and/or the https://unemployment.ohio.gov/.

Please contact BMD Bankruptcy Member Michael Steel at masteel@bmdllc.com or 330.374.7471, or Bankruptcy Partner Duriya Dhinojwala at dd@bmdllc.com or 330.253.5790 for further information.

Workers’ Compensation Claims and COVID-19

Can one of my employees file a workers’ compensation claim if they claim that they contracted coronavirus at work? We get that question a lot. Yes, they can, but you should oppose any application for coverage if you receive one. Generally, the claim will not be granted unless the employee has a job that poses a special hazard or risk of exposure to the virus and the employee can prove that he or she contracted the virus at work.

Ohio State Dental Board Implements Teledentistry Rules

Ohio law defines “teledentistry” as the delivery of dental services through the use of synchronous, real-time communication and the delivery of services of a dental hygienist or expanded function dental auxiliary pursuant to a dentist’s authorization.[1] The law requires a dentist who desires to provide dental services through teledentistry to apply for a teledentistry permit from the Ohio State Dental Board (“OSDB”).[2] Pursuant to the mandate under Ohio Revised Code 4715.436, the OSDB is implementing the following teledentistry permit rules and requirements (to be set forth under Ohio Administrative Code Chapter 4715-23). These regulations, which were subject of a public hearing on February 19, 2020, are effective on May 30, 2020.

HHS Addresses Drug Manufacturer Coupons on Out-of-Pocket Limits

On May 7, 2020, the US Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) announced their Notice of Benefit Parameters for 2021 in which HHS addressed the application of prescription drug manufacturer copay coupons towards a patient’s out-of-pocket limit. Under this guidance, HHS will permit, but not require, plans and insurers to count direct support offered to enrollees by drug manufacturers (i.e., coupons) for specific prescription drugs toward the annual limits on cost-sharing, regardless of whether a generic equivalent is available.

Important Updates, Deadlines, and Clarifications for the HHS Provider Relief Funds

On May 20, 2020, HHS made important updates and clarifications regarding the General Distribution payments to providers. Between April 10, 2020 and April 24, 2020, HHS distributed an initial $30 billion to providers based on the provider’s 2019 Medicare fee-for-service receipts. These funds were distributed automatically and providers did not need to submit an application in order to receive these funds. The funds were originally touted as a “no strings attached” stimulus payment reserved for healthcare providers. But HHS issued a 10-page Terms and Conditions and required that providers sign an attestation confirming receipt of the funds and agreeing to the Terms and Conditions.

Reopening & Social Media: Tips for Businesses

As the country starts to reopen, businesses are under great pressure to keep employees and customers safe. Even if a business follows every reopening requirement, there will inevitably be scrutiny from within and outside the organization. And, in this world of social media, perception tends to become reality. Below are a few practical tips to avoid attracting negative press while restarting your business.