Client Alerts, News Articles & Blog Posts

Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

FDIC Provides Guidance on Loan Modifications & Workout Options for Borrowers Affected by COVID-19

On March 22, 2020, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp (FDIC) and other federal banking regulatory agencies, along with state banking regulators, the National Credit Union Administration Agency (NCUA), the regulator of credit unions, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued the Interagency Statement on Loan Modifications and Reporting by Financial Institutions Working with Customers Affected by the Coronavirus  to encourage financial institutions to work constructively with borrowers impacted by the disease and to provide additional information regarding loan modifications. In summary, the policies give lenders or bankers substantially more latitude to work with affected borrowers by softening the regulatory and accounting impact of having delinquent or restructured credit.

The Interagency Statement can be found here: https://www.fdic.gov/news/news/financial/2020/fil20022.html?mc_cid=c19ae173ad&mc_eid=fabbc3a33b

As described in the Interagency Statement, the FDIC:

  • Encourages financial institutions to work constructively with borrowers affected by COVID-19;
  • Will not criticize institutions for prudent loan modifications and will not direct supervised institutions to automatically categorize COVID-19-related loan modifications as troubled debt restructurings (TDRs);
  • Confirmed with staff of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) that short-term modifications made on a good faith basis for COVID-19 borrowers who were current prior to any COVID-19 relief are not TDRs;
  • Views that modification efforts described in the interagency statement for borrowers of one-to-four family residential mortgages where loans are prudently underwritten and not past due or carried in nonaccrual status do not result in loans being considered restructured or modified for the purpose of respective risk-based capital rules; and
  • Views prudent loan modification programs to financial institution customers affected by COVID-19 as positive actions that can effectively manage or mitigate adverse impacts on borrowers due to COVID-19, and lead to improved loan performance and reduced credit risk.

Borrowers, lenders, and other businesses should open early candid lines of communication with one another to negotiate forbearance agreements, extensions, refinancing, restructuring or other related relief. These arrangements must be documented and BMD attorneys can help you with this loan modification or workout process. 

For Ohio Businesses impacted by COVID-19, there are low-interest loans available to businesses in all Ohio counties. SBA low-interest federal disaster loans can provide up to $2 million of working capital to help Ohio business owners in overcoming temporary losses of revenue they are experiencing as a result of COVID 19. The assistance may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that cannot be paid due to economic impacts. These loans are available to small businesses and private, non-profit organizations to help alleviate economic injury caused by the coronavirus.

The following are links to the SBA programs:

Additionally, you can talk to your banker. Be proactive. Let them know you are addressing the situation and/or applying for the SBA Loan and do so immediately. While many people may ordinarily avoid contacting their banker or creditors to talk about problems, under the Interagency Statement this is a safe time to do so because everyone is experiencing the same problems.

The state of Ohio has also provided unemployment benefits for Ohio individuals impacted by COVID-19. You can access information about these benefits with the following links: Coronavirus and Unemployment Benefits Questions and Answers at: http://jfs.ohio.gov/ouio/CoronavirusAndUI/ and/or the https://unemployment.ohio.gov/.

Please contact BMD Bankruptcy Member Michael Steel at masteel@bmdllc.com or 330.374.7471, or Bankruptcy Partner Duriya Dhinojwala at dd@bmdllc.com or 330.253.5790 for further information.

Changes to Physician Assistant Statutes in Florida

In the last year, there have been many changes to the scope of practice and collaboration/supervision requirements for advanced practice providers such as APRNs and physician assistants in the state of Florida. In a previous Client Alert we discussed House Bill 607, which expanded the autonomous practice of APRNs providing primary care services in Florida.

Ohio Senate Bill 49 – Ohio Expands Lien Rights for Design Professionals

Effective September 30, 2021, Ohio granted limited lien rights to design professionals, including architects, landscape architects, engineers, and surveyors. Ohio Governor Mike DeWine signed Senate Bill 49 into law on July 1, 2021. This new law established a statutory right to lien commercial real estate by Ohio design professionals who, until now, could not file a lien for non-payment of professional services. Senator Vernon Sykes, a primary sponsor of Senate Bill 49, stated that the “legislation ensures that architects, engineers and other designers will get paid for their work, regardless of the outcome of their projects . . . It will support hardworking Ohioans by protecting the value of their labor . . ..”

Primary Care Practice Officially Defined in Florida for APRNs Practicing Autonomously

As many providers in Florida are aware, House Bill 607 (the “Bill”), which was passed in February of last year, gives certain APRNs in Florida the ability to practice autonomously. The only catch is that they must work in primary practice. When the Bill was initially passed, there was question as to what was exactly considered primary care, absent a definition from the Florida Board of Nursing. However, as of February 25, 2021, “primary care practice” has officially been defined.

Part II of the No Surprises Act

The Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) published Part II of the No Surprises Act on September 30, 2021, which will take effect on January 1, 2022. The new guidance, in large part, focuses on the independent dispute resolution process that was briefly mentioned in Part I of the Act. In addition, there is now guidance on good faith estimate requirements, the patient-provider dispute resolution processes, and added external review provisions.

Safer Federal Workforce Task Force - Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors

The Safer Federal Workforce Task Force has issued its Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors (Guidance). Note that the Guidance applies only to “covered contracts,” which are contracts that include the clause (Clause) set forth in Sec. 2(a) of Executive Order 14042 (Ensuring Adequate COVID Safety Protocols for Federal Contractors). The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council (FARC) is to conduct rulemaking and take related action to ensure that the Clause is incorporated into federal contracts. Until that happens, federal contractors likely will not see the Clause in its contracts. Following is a broad summary of the Guidance.