Client Alerts, News Articles & Blog Posts

Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

New NIL Opportunities for Student-Athletes Require Diligent Review

On June 28, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine signed Executive Order 2021-10D, “Establishing the Duties of Colleges and Universities as to Name, Image, and Likeness Compensation of Student-Athletes.” The Executive Order was motivated by the passage of similar name, image, and likeness (“NIL”) regulations in seventeen (17) other states; Ohio followed suit to avoid a significant competitive disadvantage in attracting student-athletes to the state.

The Executive Order permits NIL compensation which opens a financial industry for student-athletes to leverage – but with these new opportunities comes new significant concerns. Student-athletes should be cognizant of common contract clauses that, if overlooked, could hold serious future ramifications.

Does your NIL contract contain commercially unreasonable terms?

NIL sponsorship and licensing agreements will pose unique considerations and applications as the industry continues to expand. Below are some of the potential contractual provisions that should garner special attention and legal review before signing:

  • Term of Agreement – specifies the duration of the agreement (e.g. how long the agreement will be in effect)
  • Termination Rights – details each party’s ability to terminate the agreement
  • Non-Competition – may require the student-athlete only negotiates with or partners with a specific company in a specified geographic area for a period of time (which may include a tail period that extends beyond the agreement’s term)
  • Exclusivity, Non-Solicitation, and/or Non-Circumvention – may bar the student-athlete from negotiating with a potential partner after the duration of a specific agreement
  • License Details – may allow a company permission to use a student athlete’s NIL for an indefinite period of time and an unbounded area with unfettered discretion
  • Confidentiality – may restrict the student-athlete from sharing or otherwise using any information received or provided under the agreement, which may include compensation terms
  • Severability – allows for the removal of provisions that are later deemed preempted or disallowed by statute, while the rest of the agreement remains intact
  • Force Majeure – allows for nonperformance from a party if an act of God or other event outside the control of a party precludes the performance of the contract’s terms, which could include an injury to the student-athlete.

Please contact one of the following BMD Corporate Attorneys for assistance on any NIL matters, including review of the underlying NIL agreement:

Changes to Physician Assistant Statutes in Florida

In the last year, there have been many changes to the scope of practice and collaboration/supervision requirements for advanced practice providers such as APRNs and physician assistants in the state of Florida. In a previous Client Alert we discussed House Bill 607, which expanded the autonomous practice of APRNs providing primary care services in Florida.

Ohio Senate Bill 49 – Ohio Expands Lien Rights for Design Professionals

Effective September 30, 2021, Ohio granted limited lien rights to design professionals, including architects, landscape architects, engineers, and surveyors. Ohio Governor Mike DeWine signed Senate Bill 49 into law on July 1, 2021. This new law established a statutory right to lien commercial real estate by Ohio design professionals who, until now, could not file a lien for non-payment of professional services. Senator Vernon Sykes, a primary sponsor of Senate Bill 49, stated that the “legislation ensures that architects, engineers and other designers will get paid for their work, regardless of the outcome of their projects . . . It will support hardworking Ohioans by protecting the value of their labor . . ..”

Primary Care Practice Officially Defined in Florida for APRNs Practicing Autonomously

As many providers in Florida are aware, House Bill 607 (the “Bill”), which was passed in February of last year, gives certain APRNs in Florida the ability to practice autonomously. The only catch is that they must work in primary practice. When the Bill was initially passed, there was question as to what was exactly considered primary care, absent a definition from the Florida Board of Nursing. However, as of February 25, 2021, “primary care practice” has officially been defined.

Part II of the No Surprises Act

The Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) published Part II of the No Surprises Act on September 30, 2021, which will take effect on January 1, 2022. The new guidance, in large part, focuses on the independent dispute resolution process that was briefly mentioned in Part I of the Act. In addition, there is now guidance on good faith estimate requirements, the patient-provider dispute resolution processes, and added external review provisions.

Safer Federal Workforce Task Force - Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors

The Safer Federal Workforce Task Force has issued its Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors (Guidance). Note that the Guidance applies only to “covered contracts,” which are contracts that include the clause (Clause) set forth in Sec. 2(a) of Executive Order 14042 (Ensuring Adequate COVID Safety Protocols for Federal Contractors). The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council (FARC) is to conduct rulemaking and take related action to ensure that the Clause is incorporated into federal contracts. Until that happens, federal contractors likely will not see the Clause in its contracts. Following is a broad summary of the Guidance.