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Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

New NIL Opportunities for Student-Athletes Require Diligent Review

Client Alert

On June 28, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine signed Executive Order 2021-10D, “Establishing the Duties of Colleges and Universities as to Name, Image, and Likeness Compensation of Student-Athletes.” The Executive Order was motivated by the passage of similar name, image, and likeness (“NIL”) regulations in seventeen (17) other states; Ohio followed suit to avoid a significant competitive disadvantage in attracting student-athletes to the state.

The Executive Order permits NIL compensation which opens a financial industry for student-athletes to leverage – but with these new opportunities comes new significant concerns. Student-athletes should be cognizant of common contract clauses that, if overlooked, could hold serious future ramifications.

Does your NIL contract contain commercially unreasonable terms?

NIL sponsorship and licensing agreements will pose unique considerations and applications as the industry continues to expand. Below are some of the potential contractual provisions that should garner special attention and legal review before signing:

  • Term of Agreement – specifies the duration of the agreement (e.g. how long the agreement will be in effect)
  • Termination Rights – details each party’s ability to terminate the agreement
  • Non-Competition – may require the student-athlete only negotiates with or partners with a specific company in a specified geographic area for a period of time (which may include a tail period that extends beyond the agreement’s term)
  • Exclusivity, Non-Solicitation, and/or Non-Circumvention – may bar the student-athlete from negotiating with a potential partner after the duration of a specific agreement
  • License Details – may allow a company permission to use a student athlete’s NIL for an indefinite period of time and an unbounded area with unfettered discretion
  • Confidentiality – may restrict the student-athlete from sharing or otherwise using any information received or provided under the agreement, which may include compensation terms
  • Severability – allows for the removal of provisions that are later deemed preempted or disallowed by statute, while the rest of the agreement remains intact
  • Force Majeure – allows for nonperformance from a party if an act of God or other event outside the control of a party precludes the performance of the contract’s terms, which could include an injury to the student-athlete.

Please contact one of the following BMD Corporate Attorneys for assistance on any NIL matters, including review of the underlying NIL agreement:


House Bill 249: Key Updates to Involuntary Hospitalization Law for Mental Health Providers

House Bill 249 (HB 249) proposes changes to Ohio Revised Code (ORC) Sections 5122.01 and 5122.10 to expand the conditions under which a person with a mental illness can be involuntarily hospitalized.

Starting an Advanced Practice Provider Practice

Advanced practice providers (APPs), which includes non-physician providers such as nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and nurse anesthetists, commonly start their own healthcare practices. Practices may provide, for example, service offerings such as primary care, anesthesiology, mental health, and aesthetics (medical spas). However, there are a number of considerations and steps that must be taken for APPs to compliantly function independently.

FTC Increases Targeting of Companies Lacking Cyber Protection

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently released a comprehensive cybersecurity report outlining key findings and recommendations based on emerging threats, trends in data breaches, and strategies for businesses to enhance their cybersecurity posture observed over the last year.

New Federal Medical Conscience Rule and Its Implications

The Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights issued a Final Rule to clarify protections for healthcare providers who refuse services based on religious or moral beliefs. This includes protection against discrimination for refusing procedures like assisted suicide or abortion. The OCR can receive complaints, conduct investigations, and enforce these protections. Entities are encouraged to update policies accordingly and display a model notice provided by the OCR.

Marijuana Reclassification and APRN/PA Prescribing

Marijuana is expected to be reclassified by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) from a Schedule I controlled substance to a Schedule III controlled substance as a result of efforts by the Biden administration.