Client Alerts, News Articles & Blog Posts

Everything you need to know about BMD and the industry.

Healthcare Acquisitions and Divestitures During the COVID-19 Pandemic

It seems as though all aspects of our personal and professional lives have been impacted in one way or another by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Healthcare acquisitions and divestitures are no exception. Although the ramifications depend on the specific circumstances of each transaction, we are noticing certain common threads woven among recently closed and currently in progress transactions in the healthcare industry. Here are a few of the questions that often arise as we work with clients to navigate the current business landscape both during and after the COVID epidemic. 

  • Valuations. It’s no secret that numerous businesses are experiencing financial distress. Some of the country’s largest financial institutions are ramping up hiring in their bankruptcy and distressed credit divisions, indicating the players in the best position to know believe that rates of financial distress and delinquencies will continue to rise in the near term. How should the financial performance of the business during the pandemic (which may include recent business interruption, decline in revenue or increase in costs) be taken into consideration when determining the overall value of the business? How should buyers price in the risk created by COVID-induced uncertainty? Most commentators note that the COVID-19 pandemic has shifted deal dynamics in favor of buyers, creating a buyers’ market. How should buyers and sellers change their “deal playbook” and/or negotiation strategy in response to these market forces? 
  • Earnouts. It’s important to each transaction party that it ultimately receives the benefit of its bargain. What is the likelihood that the seller will receive the earnout in whole or in part? Are the earnout targets based upon pre-pandemic figures and economic assumptions? Should more of the purchase price be shifted to the earnout to mitigate risk for the buyer? Can the earnout measurement period be extended in an effort to mitigate the impact to the seller of a potential future short-term economic decline?  
  • Escrow. The parties may be aware of certain contingent liabilities attributable to pandemic-related contractual disputes, litigation or regulatory non-compliance. How much of the purchase price should be placed in escrow given potential COVID-19 related risks identified in diligence?  
  • Employment Law Considerations. It’s been a busy year for employment attorneys and businesses implementing related compliance requirements. Are there potential governmental enforcement actions or employee lawsuits on the horizon for the seller? Has the seller complied with recent employment law changes and cumbersome but crucial workplace health and safety requirements? Have members of the seller’s workforce tested positive for COVID-19? 
  • Litigation and Other Disputes. It is no secret that the public health emergency has resulted in substantial supply chain disruption and payment defaults. If applicable, what is the seller’s likelihood of success under force majeure, termination and other key contractual provisions.  Has the pandemic resulted in current or potential litigation with landlords, vendors, insurers, customers, lenders, employees or others?  
  • Compliance Requirements. The federal government has made it clear that certain recipients of SBA PPP loans and HHS Provider Relief Fund payments will be subject to governmental audit and scrutiny. Has the seller received SBA loans or grants or Provider Relief Funds?  If so, is the seller complying with the related attestation, documentation and forgiveness requirements? Does the seller have the proper Provider Relief Fund policies and procedures in place?  
  • Cybersecurity. Governmental authorities have identified increased cybersecurity risks to businesses during the pandemic. Does the seller have an active and robust data privacy and security program? Has the seller experienced any recent breaches and, if so, were they addressed appropriately?  
  • Purchased Assets and Assumed Contracts. What will happen if the pandemic results in a material adverse change in the seller’s business between the date when the purchase agreement is signed and the date of the closing? What if the business isn’t operating in the ordinary course in accordance with past practice and/or historical financial results?  Is the buyer required to proceed with the closing? Will there be an adjustment to the purchase price? Is the seller in compliance with all of its representations, warranties, covenants and other obligations in the primary transaction agreement(s)? Will the seller be liable for related damages?  
  • Representations and Warranties Insurance. Having comprehensive representation and warranty insurance in place can benefit both parties to the transaction. Will the insurer exclude representation and warranty claims related to the COVID-19 pandemic from the insurance coverage? It may be important for buyers to reach out to several insurers and compare the coverage available.

As the pace of deal activity within the health care space continues to increase, our firm’s attorneys are working daily with clients to further develop and adjust their strategies to respond to changes and uncertainty in today’s environment. Please let us know if we may assist you to brainstorm potential transaction structures and “best practices” to mitigate business and regulatory risk during this time, while maximizing transaction value. We’d be delighted to discuss with you further. For additional information, please contact Kate Hickner at kehickner@bmdllc.com or Kevin Saunders at rksaunders@bmdllc.com. 

El Contrato Escrito: La Herramienta Predilecta

No existe mejor herramienta a una disputa contractual que un documento firmado por las partes en el cual se expongan las obligaciones y acuerdos entre éstas.

New State Budget Institutes Licensure Requirement for Ohio’s Hospitals

On July 1, 2021, Governor Mike DeWine signed Ohio’s final budget codified at Ohio Revised Code 3722.01 et seq., which includes a new licensing requirement for Ohio’s hospitals. For years, Ohio was the only state in the country that did not license its hospitals. This approach will now be replaced with new, detailed requirements that will require careful review and compliance. Here are some of the highlights concerning these new changes:

Healthcare Provisions in the Ohio FY 22-23 Budget

Governor Mike DeWine signed Ohio’s Fiscal Year 2022-2023 budget bill (HB 110) into law on July 1, 2021. At almost 1,000 pages and 74.1 billion dollars, the budget lays out the State’s spending for the next two years. Below are a few highlighted provisions from the budget that will be important for the healthcare industry in Ohio

Interim Final Rule for Surprise Billing

In an effort to implement the new bipartisan No Surprises Act, on July 1, 2021, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), along with the Departments of Labor and Treasury, issued an interim final rule to safeguard patients against unforeseen medical bills arising from out-of-network care.

President Biden Seeks to Limit Non-Compete Agreements

Today, President Biden announced he would issue an Executive Order that calls on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to adopt rules to curtail worker non-compete agreements. Interestingly, a week ago, the FTC approved changes to its Rules of Practice to modernize and expedite the way it issues Trade Regulation Rules. If you have followed our alerts, we predicted the elimination of non-competes would probably happen. In 2016, then-Vice President Biden was a vocal opponent against non-compete agreements. He led the Obama administration’s initiative seeking to limit or eliminate non-compete agreements. In his presidential campaign, Biden promised to “work with Congress to eliminate all non-compete agreements, except the very few that are absolutely necessary to protect a narrowly defined category of trade secrets . . ..”