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Healthcare Acquisitions and Divestitures During the COVID-19 Pandemic

It seems as though all aspects of our personal and professional lives have been impacted in one way or another by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Healthcare acquisitions and divestitures are no exception. Although the ramifications depend on the specific circumstances of each transaction, we are noticing certain common threads woven among recently closed and currently in progress transactions in the healthcare industry. Here are a few of the questions that often arise as we work with clients to navigate the current business landscape both during and after the COVID epidemic. 

  • Valuations. It’s no secret that numerous businesses are experiencing financial distress. Some of the country’s largest financial institutions are ramping up hiring in their bankruptcy and distressed credit divisions, indicating the players in the best position to know believe that rates of financial distress and delinquencies will continue to rise in the near term. How should the financial performance of the business during the pandemic (which may include recent business interruption, decline in revenue or increase in costs) be taken into consideration when determining the overall value of the business? How should buyers price in the risk created by COVID-induced uncertainty? Most commentators note that the COVID-19 pandemic has shifted deal dynamics in favor of buyers, creating a buyers’ market. How should buyers and sellers change their “deal playbook” and/or negotiation strategy in response to these market forces? 
  • Earnouts. It’s important to each transaction party that it ultimately receives the benefit of its bargain. What is the likelihood that the seller will receive the earnout in whole or in part? Are the earnout targets based upon pre-pandemic figures and economic assumptions? Should more of the purchase price be shifted to the earnout to mitigate risk for the buyer? Can the earnout measurement period be extended in an effort to mitigate the impact to the seller of a potential future short-term economic decline?  
  • Escrow. The parties may be aware of certain contingent liabilities attributable to pandemic-related contractual disputes, litigation or regulatory non-compliance. How much of the purchase price should be placed in escrow given potential COVID-19 related risks identified in diligence?  
  • Employment Law Considerations. It’s been a busy year for employment attorneys and businesses implementing related compliance requirements. Are there potential governmental enforcement actions or employee lawsuits on the horizon for the seller? Has the seller complied with recent employment law changes and cumbersome but crucial workplace health and safety requirements? Have members of the seller’s workforce tested positive for COVID-19? 
  • Litigation and Other Disputes. It is no secret that the public health emergency has resulted in substantial supply chain disruption and payment defaults. If applicable, what is the seller’s likelihood of success under force majeure, termination and other key contractual provisions.  Has the pandemic resulted in current or potential litigation with landlords, vendors, insurers, customers, lenders, employees or others?  
  • Compliance Requirements. The federal government has made it clear that certain recipients of SBA PPP loans and HHS Provider Relief Fund payments will be subject to governmental audit and scrutiny. Has the seller received SBA loans or grants or Provider Relief Funds?  If so, is the seller complying with the related attestation, documentation and forgiveness requirements? Does the seller have the proper Provider Relief Fund policies and procedures in place?  
  • Cybersecurity. Governmental authorities have identified increased cybersecurity risks to businesses during the pandemic. Does the seller have an active and robust data privacy and security program? Has the seller experienced any recent breaches and, if so, were they addressed appropriately?  
  • Purchased Assets and Assumed Contracts. What will happen if the pandemic results in a material adverse change in the seller’s business between the date when the purchase agreement is signed and the date of the closing? What if the business isn’t operating in the ordinary course in accordance with past practice and/or historical financial results?  Is the buyer required to proceed with the closing? Will there be an adjustment to the purchase price? Is the seller in compliance with all of its representations, warranties, covenants and other obligations in the primary transaction agreement(s)? Will the seller be liable for related damages?  
  • Representations and Warranties Insurance. Having comprehensive representation and warranty insurance in place can benefit both parties to the transaction. Will the insurer exclude representation and warranty claims related to the COVID-19 pandemic from the insurance coverage? It may be important for buyers to reach out to several insurers and compare the coverage available.

As the pace of deal activity within the health care space continues to increase, our firm’s attorneys are working daily with clients to further develop and adjust their strategies to respond to changes and uncertainty in today’s environment. Please let us know if we may assist you to brainstorm potential transaction structures and “best practices” to mitigate business and regulatory risk during this time, while maximizing transaction value. We’d be delighted to discuss with you further. For additional information, please contact Kate Hickner at kehickner@bmdllc.com or Kevin Saunders at rksaunders@bmdllc.com. 

BMD Appellate Win Clarifies Waiver of Contractual Right to Arbitrate

Brennan, Manna & Diamond, LLC attorneys David M. Scott, Lucas K. Palmer, and Krista D. Warren prevailed before the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit regarding if/when a party waives a contractual right to arbitrate. Borror Property Management, LLC v. Oro Karric North, LLC, No. 20-3146 (the “Decision”).

Relief for Ohio Under the Federal American Rescue Plan Act

On March 11, 2021, President Biden signed the American Rescue Plan Act (the “Act”) — a $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package — a significant portion of which will be directed to the State of Ohio to support economic recovery, as outlined below.

Cleveland Manufacturer Violated OFAC Sanctions By Allowing Shipments To Iran - Know Your Customer and Know Their Customer

UniControl, Inc., a Cleveland, Ohio manufacturer of process controls, airflow pressure switches, boiler controls and other instruments, agreed to pay the Office of Foreign Assets Control “OFAC,” the financial enforcement agency of the U.S. Treasury Department, $216,464 to settle its liabilities for violations of the Iran Sanctions Program. OFAC stated that “this enforcement action highlights the importance of identifying and assessing multiple warning signs that indicate a foreign trade partner may be re-exporting goods to a sanctioned jurisdiction.”

Ohio Breach of Contract Statute of Limitations Shortened to 6 Years

On March 16, 2021, Governor DeWine signed into law S.B. 13 which shortens Ohio’s statute of limitations for filing lawsuits based on breach of contract. A statute of limitation is the time period within which a party must file a lawsuit before its claim expires as a matter of law.

Chinese Product Tariff Challenge Causes Flurry of Importer Lawsuits

A lawsuit filed late in 2020 at the U.S. Court of International Trade (“CIT”) challenging the U.S. Trade Representative’s (USTR) implementation of Section 301 “List 3” and “List 4” duties on products from China, HMTX Industries LLC et al. v. United States (Court No. 20-00177), has resulted in the filing of thousands of additional lawsuits brought by other affected importers. There are now 3,700+ companies added to the list, including Ford, Home Depot, Target, Tesla, and Walgreens, along with many other smaller importers.